Why does Jonathan Gruber still have a job at MIT?

It appears that hoodwinking the American people can be fun and profitable.  Fox News found, via a review of state and federal websites, that Jonathan Gruber earned $6 million in fees over the last 15 years.

But the real question is, why does Gruber still have a job at MIT?  He has admitted to fraud, lying, and deceit.  Can you imagine what the response would be if a conservative professor admitted to the kind of subterfuge that Gruber admitted to?  Students would have started a letter-writing campaign to oust him.  Other professors would have demanded his removal.  Administration officials would reluctantly announce that, though they believe in academic freedom, the conservative professor's sins are too great to ignore, and they were letting him go.

Gruber's been teaching at the university since 1992.  Where are the guardians of academic truth?  And where are the media, who, apparently, haven't bothered to ask MIT for their reaction?

Six million dollars.  Who ever said you couldn't get rich working for the government?

A Fox News review of state and federal websites, as well as published reports, finds the MIT economist and his firm have secured millions in federal and state contracts stretching back over the last fifteen years.

Most famously, the Department of Health and Human Services retained Gruber in March 2009 to produce, as the contract stipulated, “a series of technical memoranda on the estimated changes in health insurance coverage and associated costs and impacts to the government under alternative specifications of health system reform.”

That contract netted Gruber $95,000, and an additional HHS contract, inked that June, added $297,600 to the deal – steering almost $400,000 to the creator of the Gruber Microsimulation Model. Still another contract with the agency, as reported here, was said to have exceeded $2 million in value since 2007.  

The National Institutes of Health clinched a deal for a like amount ($2.05 million), and the Department of Justice contracted with Gruber for nearly $1.74 million. DOJ? You might ask. Why would the Justice Department be hiring the architect of ObamaCare? Records show Gruber earned the DOJ fee for helping to develop viable incentives to be extended to the tobacco companies in order to dissuade them from targeting teen smokers.

Similarly, Gruber collected $103,500 from the State Department for his services as an expert witness, providing testimony in a NAFTA dispute with a Canadian tobacco firm.

Then there are the state governments. The Fox News review finds Gruber and his firm have consulted for, or provided computer modeling to, at least fifteen states. Glenn Kessler, the widely respected Washington Post columnist who writes under the moniker “The Fact Checker,” reported last week that “at least eight states” have hired Gruber to assist with the launching of their health care exchanges – and Kessler added: “It’s safe to say that about $400,000 appears to be the standard rate for gaining access to the Gruber Microsimulation Model.”

With all this consulting work, it's a wonder Gruber has any time to teach.  Perhaps it's just as well.  Would you pay good money to have your kid taught by this charlatan?

It appears that hoodwinking the American people can be fun and profitable.  Fox News found, via a review of state and federal websites, that Jonathan Gruber earned $6 million in fees over the last 15 years.

But the real question is, why does Gruber still have a job at MIT?  He has admitted to fraud, lying, and deceit.  Can you imagine what the response would be if a conservative professor admitted to the kind of subterfuge that Gruber admitted to?  Students would have started a letter-writing campaign to oust him.  Other professors would have demanded his removal.  Administration officials would reluctantly announce that, though they believe in academic freedom, the conservative professor's sins are too great to ignore, and they were letting him go.

Gruber's been teaching at the university since 1992.  Where are the guardians of academic truth?  And where are the media, who, apparently, haven't bothered to ask MIT for their reaction?

Six million dollars.  Who ever said you couldn't get rich working for the government?

A Fox News review of state and federal websites, as well as published reports, finds the MIT economist and his firm have secured millions in federal and state contracts stretching back over the last fifteen years.

Most famously, the Department of Health and Human Services retained Gruber in March 2009 to produce, as the contract stipulated, “a series of technical memoranda on the estimated changes in health insurance coverage and associated costs and impacts to the government under alternative specifications of health system reform.”

That contract netted Gruber $95,000, and an additional HHS contract, inked that June, added $297,600 to the deal – steering almost $400,000 to the creator of the Gruber Microsimulation Model. Still another contract with the agency, as reported here, was said to have exceeded $2 million in value since 2007.  

The National Institutes of Health clinched a deal for a like amount ($2.05 million), and the Department of Justice contracted with Gruber for nearly $1.74 million. DOJ? You might ask. Why would the Justice Department be hiring the architect of ObamaCare? Records show Gruber earned the DOJ fee for helping to develop viable incentives to be extended to the tobacco companies in order to dissuade them from targeting teen smokers.

Similarly, Gruber collected $103,500 from the State Department for his services as an expert witness, providing testimony in a NAFTA dispute with a Canadian tobacco firm.

Then there are the state governments. The Fox News review finds Gruber and his firm have consulted for, or provided computer modeling to, at least fifteen states. Glenn Kessler, the widely respected Washington Post columnist who writes under the moniker “The Fact Checker,” reported last week that “at least eight states” have hired Gruber to assist with the launching of their health care exchanges – and Kessler added: “It’s safe to say that about $400,000 appears to be the standard rate for gaining access to the Gruber Microsimulation Model.”

With all this consulting work, it's a wonder Gruber has any time to teach.  Perhaps it's just as well.  Would you pay good money to have your kid taught by this charlatan?