Reid begs Obama to hold off immigration order until budget is passed

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid asked President Obama on Thursday to hold off issuing his executive orders on immigration until after Congress has passed a Continuing Resolutionthat will fund the government until the end of September.

Reid is sensing a growing consensus among Republicans in both chambers that a government shutdown might be the only way to halt Obama's illegal plans.

Even the two biggest RINO's in the Senate - McCain and Graham - are on board with presenting the president with a budget that does not fund his immigration schemes:

"If the president illegally tries to grant amnesty to millions of more people, I believe Congress should use every available tool to stop that amnesty and to defend the rule of law," Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) told The Huffington Post.

Even Republicans who criticized last year's government shutdown agreed. Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), both vocal critics of the previous shutdown and co-authors of the Senate immigration bill that passed last year, warned of grave consequences of Obama were to act unilaterally.

"Why not give the new Congress six months to see if we can find a way forward?" Graham told HuffPost. "You've got a bunch of new people coming in who need to be tested about what they believe regarding immigration. Patience is a virtue in life, it's a necessity in a democracy. I just think it's ill-conceived and the public will rebel against it."

Graham added that he had appealed directly to the White House on the matter.

"I said, 'Listen, what's the downside of giving the new Congress a chance? I think most Americans will find this inappropriate and Democrats will pay a price,'" he said. "Most Americans would be for rational comprehensive immigration reform. Very few Americans are for Barack Obama going it alone."

McCain said Obama's decision to take executive action "poisons the well in more ways than one."

"If the president were serious about immigration reform, he'd say, 'It's a new Congress, new members, in both House and Senate, and I'll give them a chance to move forward on immigration reform.' He's not going to do that," McCain said. "So you have to question whether he's really serious about immigration reform or helping with the Hispanic vote in the 2016 election."

McCain also rejected the notion that Congress had forced Obama's hand by failing to act on the issue.

"There may be something happening. You should give it time in order to find that out. What's the difference between three months?" McCain said, adding that he would "absolutely" vote for a continuing resolution that defunds any executive action Obama takes on immigration.

"If he vetoes, he vetoes," McCain said. "I believe in the Constitution. He's the one who's violating the Constitution."

If the president vetoes a CR that defunds those programs he needs to implement his plan, the onus of a government shutdown will be squarely on his shoulders. A poll last summer showed that 70% of Americans disagreed with the president's amnesty plan. And with the GOP uniting behind risking a government shutdown over the issue, you know they think they have a winning hand with the voter.

It will be difficult to defund a government program that hasn't been announced yet. So Reid is probably correct that a CR will make it through the Senate in the lame duck session if Obama holds off until close to Christmas with his plans. The new Congress can always start out by defunding whatever programs the president needs for amnesty.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid asked President Obama on Thursday to hold off issuing his executive orders on immigration until after Congress has passed a Continuing Resolutionthat will fund the government until the end of September.

Reid is sensing a growing consensus among Republicans in both chambers that a government shutdown might be the only way to halt Obama's illegal plans.

Even the two biggest RINO's in the Senate - McCain and Graham - are on board with presenting the president with a budget that does not fund his immigration schemes:

"If the president illegally tries to grant amnesty to millions of more people, I believe Congress should use every available tool to stop that amnesty and to defend the rule of law," Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) told The Huffington Post.

Even Republicans who criticized last year's government shutdown agreed. Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), both vocal critics of the previous shutdown and co-authors of the Senate immigration bill that passed last year, warned of grave consequences of Obama were to act unilaterally.

"Why not give the new Congress six months to see if we can find a way forward?" Graham told HuffPost. "You've got a bunch of new people coming in who need to be tested about what they believe regarding immigration. Patience is a virtue in life, it's a necessity in a democracy. I just think it's ill-conceived and the public will rebel against it."

Graham added that he had appealed directly to the White House on the matter.

"I said, 'Listen, what's the downside of giving the new Congress a chance? I think most Americans will find this inappropriate and Democrats will pay a price,'" he said. "Most Americans would be for rational comprehensive immigration reform. Very few Americans are for Barack Obama going it alone."

McCain said Obama's decision to take executive action "poisons the well in more ways than one."

"If the president were serious about immigration reform, he'd say, 'It's a new Congress, new members, in both House and Senate, and I'll give them a chance to move forward on immigration reform.' He's not going to do that," McCain said. "So you have to question whether he's really serious about immigration reform or helping with the Hispanic vote in the 2016 election."

McCain also rejected the notion that Congress had forced Obama's hand by failing to act on the issue.

"There may be something happening. You should give it time in order to find that out. What's the difference between three months?" McCain said, adding that he would "absolutely" vote for a continuing resolution that defunds any executive action Obama takes on immigration.

"If he vetoes, he vetoes," McCain said. "I believe in the Constitution. He's the one who's violating the Constitution."

If the president vetoes a CR that defunds those programs he needs to implement his plan, the onus of a government shutdown will be squarely on his shoulders. A poll last summer showed that 70% of Americans disagreed with the president's amnesty plan. And with the GOP uniting behind risking a government shutdown over the issue, you know they think they have a winning hand with the voter.

It will be difficult to defund a government program that hasn't been announced yet. So Reid is probably correct that a CR will make it through the Senate in the lame duck session if Obama holds off until close to Christmas with his plans. The new Congress can always start out by defunding whatever programs the president needs for amnesty.