Liberal's answer to mid term shellacking? Be more liberal

Apparently unbowed by the Democrat's massive losses in the mid term elections, liberal activists have an answer for those who are asking "What do we do now"?

Be more liberal, of course.

The Hill:

After a resounding midterm defeat, progressive leaders argue Democrats played it safe, sidelined the president and lost. But now, the party can win by moving to the left. 

“The reason Democrats lost in 2014 was that there was not a united and bold Democratic economic vision, it was very much an election about nothing, in some cases, small-bore or conservative ideas,” Adam Green, the co-founder of the Progressive Change Campaign Committee, told The Hill.

“The real issue is that the Democratic Party has not painted a picture in people’s minds of what a bold, populist Democratic governing agenda looks like.”

Green and his co-founder, Stephanie Taylor, wrote in an op-ed days after the electoral rout that the party needs to coalesce an agenda that aggressively trumpets issue like Wall Street reform, cutting the cost of college and student loans, and expanding Medicare and Social Security. They pointed out that Sen. Elizabeth Warren, the Massachusetts Democrat beloved by their organization, was popular on the stump for many embattled Democrats because she touts that message. 

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), another progressive favorite that’s weighing a bid for president in 2016, said on Friday that Americans want a more progressive message despite the midterm results.

“The irony of our time is that on virtually all of the important issues, the American people want government to act on their behalf and are progressive,” he said on The Big Picture radio show with Thom Hartmann.

“The bad news is for a hundred different reasons, they are voting for the candidates that are opposed to everything they believe in and we’ve got to figure that one out.” 

Sanders and Green both mentioned how a number of states voters backed ballot measures like a minimum wage expansion even while they chose Republican senators.   

The PCCC’s letter cites victories by Sens. Al Franken (D-Minn.), Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), and Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) as proof that a bold strategy works. But all of those races were considered safer for Democrats and gave them the leeway to tack left.

But there is a model for Democrats looking to win tight races with a progressive message: Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown. Despite his record as one of the most liberal senators, Brown embraced that reputation and sailed to reelection in 2012.

Six years of incompetence, scandal, dishonesty, and recession for most, and they think their message needs to be more government? This kind of delusional thinking doesn't affect all Democrats. Hillary Clinton will try to hide her liberalism , which is a better strategy than coming out and admitting you want more government overreach.

Actually, Republicans should be encouraging Democrats to run a more aggressive left wing campaign. The left is kidding itself if it believes that Americans support their issues but not their candidates.

Apparently unbowed by the Democrat's massive losses in the mid term elections, liberal activists have an answer for those who are asking "What do we do now"?

Be more liberal, of course.

The Hill:

After a resounding midterm defeat, progressive leaders argue Democrats played it safe, sidelined the president and lost. But now, the party can win by moving to the left. 

“The reason Democrats lost in 2014 was that there was not a united and bold Democratic economic vision, it was very much an election about nothing, in some cases, small-bore or conservative ideas,” Adam Green, the co-founder of the Progressive Change Campaign Committee, told The Hill.

“The real issue is that the Democratic Party has not painted a picture in people’s minds of what a bold, populist Democratic governing agenda looks like.”

Green and his co-founder, Stephanie Taylor, wrote in an op-ed days after the electoral rout that the party needs to coalesce an agenda that aggressively trumpets issue like Wall Street reform, cutting the cost of college and student loans, and expanding Medicare and Social Security. They pointed out that Sen. Elizabeth Warren, the Massachusetts Democrat beloved by their organization, was popular on the stump for many embattled Democrats because she touts that message. 

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), another progressive favorite that’s weighing a bid for president in 2016, said on Friday that Americans want a more progressive message despite the midterm results.

“The irony of our time is that on virtually all of the important issues, the American people want government to act on their behalf and are progressive,” he said on The Big Picture radio show with Thom Hartmann.

“The bad news is for a hundred different reasons, they are voting for the candidates that are opposed to everything they believe in and we’ve got to figure that one out.” 

Sanders and Green both mentioned how a number of states voters backed ballot measures like a minimum wage expansion even while they chose Republican senators.   

The PCCC’s letter cites victories by Sens. Al Franken (D-Minn.), Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), and Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) as proof that a bold strategy works. But all of those races were considered safer for Democrats and gave them the leeway to tack left.

But there is a model for Democrats looking to win tight races with a progressive message: Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown. Despite his record as one of the most liberal senators, Brown embraced that reputation and sailed to reelection in 2012.

Six years of incompetence, scandal, dishonesty, and recession for most, and they think their message needs to be more government? This kind of delusional thinking doesn't affect all Democrats. Hillary Clinton will try to hide her liberalism , which is a better strategy than coming out and admitting you want more government overreach.

Actually, Republicans should be encouraging Democrats to run a more aggressive left wing campaign. The left is kidding itself if it believes that Americans support their issues but not their candidates.