Iran: US must accede to "our inalienable nuclear rights'

Iran's Foreign Minister Javad Zarif says that the United States must bow to Iran's "inalienable nuclear rights" and hinted that the American negotiators were being fooled as to the extent of Iranian concession in  the current negotiations.

Washington Free Beacon:

Despite Western media reports and indications from the Obama administration that Iran may be moderating its hardline position, there has been “no change in Iran’s rigid stance on its inalienable nuclear rights,” according to comments made Tuesday by Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif and reported in Iran’s state-controlled-media.

“Some [western] countries have fallen prey to miscalculations [about Iran’s position] due to wrong analyses,” Zarif was quoted as saying on the heels of another round of talks with the United States and other Western countries ahead of the Nov. 24 deadline.

U.S. sanctions against Iran “have left no impact” on Iran’s desire to “possess the civilian nuclear technology,” Iran’s Fars News Agency reported Zarif as saying. The foreign minister also framed the controversy over Iran’s nuclear weapons program as a “manufactured crisis.”

Zarif’s comments highlight the gaps that remain between Tehran and the West as negotiations approach their deadline. As Iran digs in over the right to enrich uranium, the key fuel in a nuclear bomb, the Obama administration has indicated that it may be willing to accede to this demand.

Leading congressional opponents of a deal that permits Iran to continue enriching uranium said on Wednesday that Congress will pass new sanctions if the Obama administration concedes to this demand from Tehran.

“As co-authors of bipartisan sanctions laws that compelled Iran to the negotiating table, we believe that a good deal will dismantle, not just stall, Iran’s illicit nuclear program and prevent Iran from ever becoming a threshold nuclear weapons state,” Sens. Mark Kirk (R., Ill.) and Robert Menendez (D., N.J.) said in a joint statement.

“If a potential deal does not achieve these goals, we will work with our colleagues in Congress to act decisively, as we have in the past,” the two senators said.

It had been US policy for more than a decade to refuse talks with Iran unless they suspended uranium enrichment. Obama blew up that policy. It's also US politcy that any negotiations would have as it's main goal to stop the Iranian enrichment program. Obama appears ready to blow that up too.

The president's political standing is so bad that he will refuse to send any agreement reached with Iran to the Senate for confirmation because he knows that many members of his own party will refuse to vote for it. Any deal that allows Iran to have a nuclear program that enriches uranium means that Iran will be capable of building a bomb.

According to the president's previous statements, that should be "unacceptable." Funny how the "unacceptable" suddenly becomes "acceptable" when your desire to "make history" supercedes your country's national security.

Iran's Foreign Minister Javad Zarif says that the United States must bow to Iran's "inalienable nuclear rights" and hinted that the American negotiators were being fooled as to the extent of Iranian concession in  the current negotiations.

Washington Free Beacon:

Despite Western media reports and indications from the Obama administration that Iran may be moderating its hardline position, there has been “no change in Iran’s rigid stance on its inalienable nuclear rights,” according to comments made Tuesday by Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif and reported in Iran’s state-controlled-media.

“Some [western] countries have fallen prey to miscalculations [about Iran’s position] due to wrong analyses,” Zarif was quoted as saying on the heels of another round of talks with the United States and other Western countries ahead of the Nov. 24 deadline.

U.S. sanctions against Iran “have left no impact” on Iran’s desire to “possess the civilian nuclear technology,” Iran’s Fars News Agency reported Zarif as saying. The foreign minister also framed the controversy over Iran’s nuclear weapons program as a “manufactured crisis.”

Zarif’s comments highlight the gaps that remain between Tehran and the West as negotiations approach their deadline. As Iran digs in over the right to enrich uranium, the key fuel in a nuclear bomb, the Obama administration has indicated that it may be willing to accede to this demand.

Leading congressional opponents of a deal that permits Iran to continue enriching uranium said on Wednesday that Congress will pass new sanctions if the Obama administration concedes to this demand from Tehran.

“As co-authors of bipartisan sanctions laws that compelled Iran to the negotiating table, we believe that a good deal will dismantle, not just stall, Iran’s illicit nuclear program and prevent Iran from ever becoming a threshold nuclear weapons state,” Sens. Mark Kirk (R., Ill.) and Robert Menendez (D., N.J.) said in a joint statement.

“If a potential deal does not achieve these goals, we will work with our colleagues in Congress to act decisively, as we have in the past,” the two senators said.

It had been US policy for more than a decade to refuse talks with Iran unless they suspended uranium enrichment. Obama blew up that policy. It's also US politcy that any negotiations would have as it's main goal to stop the Iranian enrichment program. Obama appears ready to blow that up too.

The president's political standing is so bad that he will refuse to send any agreement reached with Iran to the Senate for confirmation because he knows that many members of his own party will refuse to vote for it. Any deal that allows Iran to have a nuclear program that enriches uranium means that Iran will be capable of building a bomb.

According to the president's previous statements, that should be "unacceptable." Funny how the "unacceptable" suddenly becomes "acceptable" when your desire to "make history" supercedes your country's national security.