Ferguson: Four (among many) wrong-headed, insulting, dangerous, offensive, inept, and inexcusable things

1) Where was law enforcement?

In the days leading up to the grand jury announcement, there was wall-to-wall coverage of preparations in and around Ferguson in anticipation of mass rioting.  A state of emergency was declared ahead of time.  Police were outfitted in military gear.  The national guard was activated.  Staging areas were set up.  Tanks rolled in.

One presumed that this was to keep the community safe and to clamp down on violence.

Then the announcement was made: no indictment.  And the city began to burn, with throngs of people running around out of control; shooting, looting, and smashing things; destroying police cars, setting fires, throwing rocks and bricks; arms overflowing with goods stolen from stores they ransacked; screaming, laughing, threatening; running in mad circles, crisscrossing streets as fires blazed. 

Besides feeling disgusting and enraged at the spectacle, I also couldn’t help but wonder: what happened to all the law enforcement officials who were put in place?  How was this madness allowed to take hold and expand?  How was it that firefighters had to run for their lives because they were being shot at?  What happened to all the planning, the law enforcement, the guns, and even the heavy artillery?

Witnessing behavior so beneath the bare minimum for human beings has been shocking.  But coupled with that has been what appears to be the abject withdrawal of the rule of law.  And that is a dangerous combination – one that does not bode well for our future.

2) No charges to be pressed against those who perjured themselves

The Ferguson prosecutor will not press charges against those who perjured themselves.

Why not?

This is yet another nail in the coffin of a once civil society now in decay.

What is this?  Some kind of affirmative action for people willing to lie under oath?  A strange type of dhimmitude equivalent?

In an interview with Megyn Kelly, Rudy Giuliani spoke out on the decision not to prosecute those who perjured themselves.  He stated how serious it is to perjure yourself, especially when your testimony could send a man to jail for life.

Indeed.

In the same interview, Giuliani also commented on how Governor Nixon did not clearly articulate what would and would not be tolerated.  Giuliani said protestors should have been told they can lawfully protest all they want, but that anyone who engages in violence, including throwing a single rock, would be arrested and thrown in jail.

Listening to Giuliani was a breath of fresh air and a reminder of how far we have fallen as a nation.  It has become rare to hear someone speak with such clarity and leadership.

3) George Stephanopoulos thinks cops should be cowards.  Oh, and Officer Wilson might be a racist.

The George Stephanopoulos interview with Officer Darren Wilson aired yesterday.  What can I say?  I hope Officer Wilson was paid a hefty sum to put up with the inanity that was the interview.  Despite Stephanopoulos’s absurd questions and insults, Wilson maintained incredible calm and professionalism.

Here are a few high lowlights:

After Wilson explained that Brown had repeatedly punched him in the face, had reached for his gun, had jammed Wilson’s gun from going off the first two times, had anger that was escalating, seemed intent on killing Wilson, and that when he (Wilson) was finally able to exit the squad car he ran in pursuit of Brown, Stephanopoulos dropped this bomb of a question: “Why not stay in the car?  He’s running away.”

What?

In the mind of a progressive, the police should not do their job.  They should simply allow felons, criminals, and even people who assault police officers to flee.

But Stephanopoulos didn’t stop there.

He had the nerve to ask Wilson if, had the assailant been white, Wilson would have done the same thing.  In other words, he suggested Wilson was a racist.

Despicable.

4) Another Georgetown University law professor makes wild accusations of racism

Coming on the heels of Georgetown University law professor Eric Michael Dyson accusing Rudy Giuliani of being a white supremacist, another law professor from Georgetown just accused Officer Wilson of being a racist.  Paul Butler made the predictable accusation during a recent CNN interview.  The reasons Butler used to justify the accusation were truly out there.  Citing Wilson’s testimony before the grand jury:

… racially charged language that Officer Wilson used in front of the grand jury. He said that the 18-year-old child had an aggressive face. He said he looked like a demon. He said that when Officer Wilson was fighting with this young man, Officer Wilson felt he felt like a 5-year-old in the hands of Hulk Hogan. Officer Wilson is 6 feet 4 inches tall. He weighs 210 pounds. Again, he did not see a human being when he was in this encounter with Michael Brown. He did not respect this man as a human being. He saw him as a threat.

Where to begin?  At the beginning (of this clip, at least).

First, this is the first time I’ve ever heard of an 18-year-old referred to as a child!  Then again, when “children” can stay on their parent’s health insurance until they’re 26, I suppose even the boundaries of childhood and adulthood have been redefined in this fundamental transformation of America.

Second, Butler is all over the map with his ideas about “racially charged” language.  Either he is being disingenuous or he is unmoored from some very basic truths about the human survival instinct.  According to Butler, when being attacked by a physically huge, completely stoned person who is in an apparent state of rage, it is wrong to feel threatened.  Instead, the victim must respect the assailant as a human being.

I presume that this absurd mental scenario applies only to situations that involve altercations between blacks and white, where whites ultimately gain the upper hand.  Otherwise Butler just raised the bar on how members of the black community are supposed to feel toward other blacks who attack them or members of their family: first and foremost, respect the attacker as a human being.

Uh-huh.

Seriously, what universe does Butler live in?  Surely he must know that human beings are hardwired to perceive threats and to respond?  And thank goodness, because it’s an important trait that enables us to survive.  (In case mere common sense is not good enough, here are a few links that address this topic: here, here, here, and here.)

Man attacks.  Man has angry facial expression.  Man defies police orders.  Man tries to use police officer’s gun against the officer.  And the cop is supposed to think: “I respect you as a human being.”

Yeah, I’m sure when people around the world throughout human history have fought for their lives against aggressors of all colors and stripes while being punched, mutilated, raped, stoned, hung, drowned, shot at, bludgeoned, knifed, or in some other way attacked, they kept in their mind’s eye that the evil-doer is a human being.

I’d like to see Mr. Butler in a fight for his life with a fellow “human being” and report back to us how that went.

And so it goes.  Progressive madness stripping society of the rule of law, common sense, and just plain-old-real-basic-and-simple-served-straight-up reality.

Hat tips: The Right Scoop

1) Where was law enforcement?

In the days leading up to the grand jury announcement, there was wall-to-wall coverage of preparations in and around Ferguson in anticipation of mass rioting.  A state of emergency was declared ahead of time.  Police were outfitted in military gear.  The national guard was activated.  Staging areas were set up.  Tanks rolled in.

One presumed that this was to keep the community safe and to clamp down on violence.

Then the announcement was made: no indictment.  And the city began to burn, with throngs of people running around out of control; shooting, looting, and smashing things; destroying police cars, setting fires, throwing rocks and bricks; arms overflowing with goods stolen from stores they ransacked; screaming, laughing, threatening; running in mad circles, crisscrossing streets as fires blazed. 

Besides feeling disgusting and enraged at the spectacle, I also couldn’t help but wonder: what happened to all the law enforcement officials who were put in place?  How was this madness allowed to take hold and expand?  How was it that firefighters had to run for their lives because they were being shot at?  What happened to all the planning, the law enforcement, the guns, and even the heavy artillery?

Witnessing behavior so beneath the bare minimum for human beings has been shocking.  But coupled with that has been what appears to be the abject withdrawal of the rule of law.  And that is a dangerous combination – one that does not bode well for our future.

2) No charges to be pressed against those who perjured themselves

The Ferguson prosecutor will not press charges against those who perjured themselves.

Why not?

This is yet another nail in the coffin of a once civil society now in decay.

What is this?  Some kind of affirmative action for people willing to lie under oath?  A strange type of dhimmitude equivalent?

In an interview with Megyn Kelly, Rudy Giuliani spoke out on the decision not to prosecute those who perjured themselves.  He stated how serious it is to perjure yourself, especially when your testimony could send a man to jail for life.

Indeed.

In the same interview, Giuliani also commented on how Governor Nixon did not clearly articulate what would and would not be tolerated.  Giuliani said protestors should have been told they can lawfully protest all they want, but that anyone who engages in violence, including throwing a single rock, would be arrested and thrown in jail.

Listening to Giuliani was a breath of fresh air and a reminder of how far we have fallen as a nation.  It has become rare to hear someone speak with such clarity and leadership.

3) George Stephanopoulos thinks cops should be cowards.  Oh, and Officer Wilson might be a racist.

The George Stephanopoulos interview with Officer Darren Wilson aired yesterday.  What can I say?  I hope Officer Wilson was paid a hefty sum to put up with the inanity that was the interview.  Despite Stephanopoulos’s absurd questions and insults, Wilson maintained incredible calm and professionalism.

Here are a few high lowlights:

After Wilson explained that Brown had repeatedly punched him in the face, had reached for his gun, had jammed Wilson’s gun from going off the first two times, had anger that was escalating, seemed intent on killing Wilson, and that when he (Wilson) was finally able to exit the squad car he ran in pursuit of Brown, Stephanopoulos dropped this bomb of a question: “Why not stay in the car?  He’s running away.”

What?

In the mind of a progressive, the police should not do their job.  They should simply allow felons, criminals, and even people who assault police officers to flee.

But Stephanopoulos didn’t stop there.

He had the nerve to ask Wilson if, had the assailant been white, Wilson would have done the same thing.  In other words, he suggested Wilson was a racist.

Despicable.

4) Another Georgetown University law professor makes wild accusations of racism

Coming on the heels of Georgetown University law professor Eric Michael Dyson accusing Rudy Giuliani of being a white supremacist, another law professor from Georgetown just accused Officer Wilson of being a racist.  Paul Butler made the predictable accusation during a recent CNN interview.  The reasons Butler used to justify the accusation were truly out there.  Citing Wilson’s testimony before the grand jury:

… racially charged language that Officer Wilson used in front of the grand jury. He said that the 18-year-old child had an aggressive face. He said he looked like a demon. He said that when Officer Wilson was fighting with this young man, Officer Wilson felt he felt like a 5-year-old in the hands of Hulk Hogan. Officer Wilson is 6 feet 4 inches tall. He weighs 210 pounds. Again, he did not see a human being when he was in this encounter with Michael Brown. He did not respect this man as a human being. He saw him as a threat.

Where to begin?  At the beginning (of this clip, at least).

First, this is the first time I’ve ever heard of an 18-year-old referred to as a child!  Then again, when “children” can stay on their parent’s health insurance until they’re 26, I suppose even the boundaries of childhood and adulthood have been redefined in this fundamental transformation of America.

Second, Butler is all over the map with his ideas about “racially charged” language.  Either he is being disingenuous or he is unmoored from some very basic truths about the human survival instinct.  According to Butler, when being attacked by a physically huge, completely stoned person who is in an apparent state of rage, it is wrong to feel threatened.  Instead, the victim must respect the assailant as a human being.

I presume that this absurd mental scenario applies only to situations that involve altercations between blacks and white, where whites ultimately gain the upper hand.  Otherwise Butler just raised the bar on how members of the black community are supposed to feel toward other blacks who attack them or members of their family: first and foremost, respect the attacker as a human being.

Uh-huh.

Seriously, what universe does Butler live in?  Surely he must know that human beings are hardwired to perceive threats and to respond?  And thank goodness, because it’s an important trait that enables us to survive.  (In case mere common sense is not good enough, here are a few links that address this topic: here, here, here, and here.)

Man attacks.  Man has angry facial expression.  Man defies police orders.  Man tries to use police officer’s gun against the officer.  And the cop is supposed to think: “I respect you as a human being.”

Yeah, I’m sure when people around the world throughout human history have fought for their lives against aggressors of all colors and stripes while being punched, mutilated, raped, stoned, hung, drowned, shot at, bludgeoned, knifed, or in some other way attacked, they kept in their mind’s eye that the evil-doer is a human being.

I’d like to see Mr. Butler in a fight for his life with a fellow “human being” and report back to us how that went.

And so it goes.  Progressive madness stripping society of the rule of law, common sense, and just plain-old-real-basic-and-simple-served-straight-up reality.

Hat tips: The Right Scoop