White House stops using emojis after less than 3 days

It was a pander too far, using emojis, popular in social media, in official White House communications aimed at millennials. Just last Wednesday, Buzzfeed reported:

 The White House is preparing a new emoji-based social media campaign to make its economic pitch to young people, BuzzFeed News has learned.

Starting Thursday, White House social media accounts will blast out charts, graphs, and yes, emojis, aimed at catching the eye of young voters weeks before the November elections.

Here is the very first tweet to use an emoji on a White House account:

But it was a more serious document that was problematic:

Even the staid administration report illustrating administration efforts to reduce student loan costs and boost enrollment in the Affordable Care Act for younger Americans — both of which contribute to improved economic opportunity for those starting careers, according to the White House — has a youthful flavor. “15 ECONOMIC FACTS ABOUT 
MILLENNIALS,” reads the cover of the White House Council Of Economic Advisors report.

As Redalert observed:

The contents of the report, however, are less chuckle-worthy, observing millennials’ negative job outlooks thanks to the recession and increasing loan debt.

Saturday, someone was found in the White House with better judgment than a teenager, and the emojis were quietly dropped. The Washington Times:

The White House has removed emoji characters out of a newly published report after news outlets indicated that some millennials were offended by the administration’s latest technique to empathize with younger voters.

The report, “15 Economic Facts About Millennials” is styled as a Buzzfeed-like listicle, which have grown in popularity among younger generations for their quick delivery and humorous nature.

The White House sprinkled emojis throughout the report on college education and studentDescription: http://images.intellitxt.com/ast/adTypes/icon1.png debt, technology, and healthcare, published on Friday, but on Saturday the emojis were missing from the document.

“This is an example of what we heard about back in 2008, Obama using digital technologies to excite a new, younger demographic,” Natalia Mehlman-Petrzela, an assistant professor of history at the New School University, told The Atlantic on Friday. “In the world of Twitter and Instagram, millennials are using emojis more and more, so it makes sense to use that strategy to appeal to people.”

Apparently not.

It was a pander too far, using emojis, popular in social media, in official White House communications aimed at millennials. Just last Wednesday, Buzzfeed reported:

 The White House is preparing a new emoji-based social media campaign to make its economic pitch to young people, BuzzFeed News has learned.

Starting Thursday, White House social media accounts will blast out charts, graphs, and yes, emojis, aimed at catching the eye of young voters weeks before the November elections.

Here is the very first tweet to use an emoji on a White House account:

But it was a more serious document that was problematic:

Even the staid administration report illustrating administration efforts to reduce student loan costs and boost enrollment in the Affordable Care Act for younger Americans — both of which contribute to improved economic opportunity for those starting careers, according to the White House — has a youthful flavor. “15 ECONOMIC FACTS ABOUT 
MILLENNIALS,” reads the cover of the White House Council Of Economic Advisors report.

As Redalert observed:

The contents of the report, however, are less chuckle-worthy, observing millennials’ negative job outlooks thanks to the recession and increasing loan debt.

Saturday, someone was found in the White House with better judgment than a teenager, and the emojis were quietly dropped. The Washington Times:

The White House has removed emoji characters out of a newly published report after news outlets indicated that some millennials were offended by the administration’s latest technique to empathize with younger voters.

The report, “15 Economic Facts About Millennials” is styled as a Buzzfeed-like listicle, which have grown in popularity among younger generations for their quick delivery and humorous nature.

The White House sprinkled emojis throughout the report on college education and studentDescription: http://images.intellitxt.com/ast/adTypes/icon1.png debt, technology, and healthcare, published on Friday, but on Saturday the emojis were missing from the document.

“This is an example of what we heard about back in 2008, Obama using digital technologies to excite a new, younger demographic,” Natalia Mehlman-Petrzela, an assistant professor of history at the New School University, told The Atlantic on Friday. “In the world of Twitter and Instagram, millennials are using emojis more and more, so it makes sense to use that strategy to appeal to people.”

Apparently not.