The Terror Threat of Weaponized Muslims

Two terror attacks in Canada this week by recent converts to Islam have exposed the clear and present danger created by the violent rhetoric of the Koran.  Credit Prime Minister Harper for having the guts to use the T-word while President Obama’s team continues to pretend that Muslim fanatics shouting jihadist rhetoric and shooting or beheading innocents are “workplace violence.”

But there are some uncomfortable conclusions to be drawn from the terror acts committed by Martin Couture-Rouleau, a recent convert to Islam who ran over one soldier and injured another, and Michael Zehaf-Bibeau, who, it is reported, returned to the Islamic faith of his father. The Toronto Globe and Mail reports:

Mr. Zehaf-Bibeau was born in 1982 and was the son of Bulgasem Zehaf, a Quebec businessman who appears to have fought in 2011 in Libya, and Susan Bibeau, the deputy chairperson of a division of Canada’s Immigration and Refugee Board. The two were divorced in 1999. (snip)

Mr. Zehaf-Bibeau grew up in Eastern Canada, including Ottawa and Montreal, and had spent time in Libya before moving to Western Canada to become a miner and labourer, according to friend Dave Bathurst.

Mr. Bathurst said he met Mr. Zehaf-Bibeau in a Burnaby, B.C., mosque about three years ago. He said his friend did not at first appear to have extremist views or inclinations toward violence – but at times exhibited a disturbing side.

“We were having a conversation in a kitchen, and I don’t know how he worded it: He said the devil is after him,” Mr. Bathurst said in an interview. He said his friend frequently talked about the presence of Shaytan in the world – an Arabic term for devils and demons. “I think he must have been mentally ill.”

Mr. Bathurst last saw Mr. Zehaf-Bibeau praying in a Vancouver-area mosque six weeks ago. He spoke of wanting to go to the Middle East soon.

“He wanted to go back to Libya and study,” Mr. Bathurst said. He urged his friend to make sure study was on his mind and “not something else.”

Mr. Zehaf-Bibeau insisted he was only going abroad with the intent of learning about Islam and to study Arabic.

Both Canadian men, along with Major Hasan, appear to be mentally disturbed, or at least anti-social. The problem is that Islamic scripture provides justification and encouragement for violence enacted against kufrs, people who do not subscribe to Islamic doctrine.

Yes, most Muslims do not act on these exhortations. But the problem is that angry, anti-social, and mentally disturbed individuals can seize on these doctrines and act on them. ISIS is currently encouraging such actions, and they have ample support from Islamic theology in doing so.

Those are facts. They are uncomfortable for multiculturalists, but they are also a clear and present danger. Islam is different from all the world’s other major religions. We need to recognize that and treat Islam differently when it comes to immigration and especially proselytization in prisons, one of the major sources of Muslim converts in the United States. Is that religious discrimination? Yes. But the Constitution is not a suicide pact, in the words of Justice Jackson.

Two terror attacks in Canada this week by recent converts to Islam have exposed the clear and present danger created by the violent rhetoric of the Koran.  Credit Prime Minister Harper for having the guts to use the T-word while President Obama’s team continues to pretend that Muslim fanatics shouting jihadist rhetoric and shooting or beheading innocents are “workplace violence.”

But there are some uncomfortable conclusions to be drawn from the terror acts committed by Martin Couture-Rouleau, a recent convert to Islam who ran over one soldier and injured another, and Michael Zehaf-Bibeau, who, it is reported, returned to the Islamic faith of his father. The Toronto Globe and Mail reports:

Mr. Zehaf-Bibeau was born in 1982 and was the son of Bulgasem Zehaf, a Quebec businessman who appears to have fought in 2011 in Libya, and Susan Bibeau, the deputy chairperson of a division of Canada’s Immigration and Refugee Board. The two were divorced in 1999. (snip)

Mr. Zehaf-Bibeau grew up in Eastern Canada, including Ottawa and Montreal, and had spent time in Libya before moving to Western Canada to become a miner and labourer, according to friend Dave Bathurst.

Mr. Bathurst said he met Mr. Zehaf-Bibeau in a Burnaby, B.C., mosque about three years ago. He said his friend did not at first appear to have extremist views or inclinations toward violence – but at times exhibited a disturbing side.

“We were having a conversation in a kitchen, and I don’t know how he worded it: He said the devil is after him,” Mr. Bathurst said in an interview. He said his friend frequently talked about the presence of Shaytan in the world – an Arabic term for devils and demons. “I think he must have been mentally ill.”

Mr. Bathurst last saw Mr. Zehaf-Bibeau praying in a Vancouver-area mosque six weeks ago. He spoke of wanting to go to the Middle East soon.

“He wanted to go back to Libya and study,” Mr. Bathurst said. He urged his friend to make sure study was on his mind and “not something else.”

Mr. Zehaf-Bibeau insisted he was only going abroad with the intent of learning about Islam and to study Arabic.

Both Canadian men, along with Major Hasan, appear to be mentally disturbed, or at least anti-social. The problem is that Islamic scripture provides justification and encouragement for violence enacted against kufrs, people who do not subscribe to Islamic doctrine.

Yes, most Muslims do not act on these exhortations. But the problem is that angry, anti-social, and mentally disturbed individuals can seize on these doctrines and act on them. ISIS is currently encouraging such actions, and they have ample support from Islamic theology in doing so.

Those are facts. They are uncomfortable for multiculturalists, but they are also a clear and present danger. Islam is different from all the world’s other major religions. We need to recognize that and treat Islam differently when it comes to immigration and especially proselytization in prisons, one of the major sources of Muslim converts in the United States. Is that religious discrimination? Yes. But the Constitution is not a suicide pact, in the words of Justice Jackson.