Ruling class bullies defied on anti-'Redskins' campaign

One of the most egregious and pervasive examples of the left wing ruling class exercising its cultural dominance is the vicious campaign to force the Washington Redskins football tram to abandon its historic name.  History and tradition are an intrinsic part of sports teams, and if the serfs can be forced to capitulate and abandon their beloved team name, then the door is opened to further cultural control being exercised with less resistance. It is in multiple senses a symbolic battle aimed at breaking the will of the American people.

The potentates of political correctness have declared the name “Redskins” is “hate speech.” The Washington Post editorial board self-righteously proclaimed it would no longer use the term on their editorial pages.

Gadfly lawyer John Banzhaf is petitioning the FCC to suspend the license of a Washington, DC area radio station owned by the proprietor of the Redskins for employing the term, potentially But these bullies do not speak for the Native Americans they pretend to represent. Surveys have demonstrated the vast majority of NAs are not offended by the term, while the team’s fans also want to keep it.

Even more dramatic is the use of the name “Redskins” by high school teams where a substantial majority or even all of the students are Native Americans. One such school is in Red Mesa, Arizona. The Washington Post news pages, which don’t suffer ubder the PC regime of the editorial board, visited the school and published a long and interesting article on the school, the team, and the feelings around the name the bullies can’t abide.

RED MESA, Ariz. — The fans poured into the bleachers on a Friday night, erupting in “Let’s go, Redskins!” chants that echoed across a new field of artificial turf, glowing green against a vast dun-colored landscape.

Inside the Red Mesa High School locker room, Ted Nugent’s “Stranglehold” blared on the stereo as players hurried to strap on their helmets and gather for a pregame prayer and pep talk.

“This is your time, right?” the team’s assistant coach demanded.

“Yes, sir!” the players shouted. “Redskins on three! Redskins on three! One, two, three, Redskins!”

The scene at this tiny, remote high school was as boisterous as it was remarkable: Nearly everyone on the field and in the bleachers belongs to the Navajo Nation. Most of the people in Red Mesa not only reject claims that their team’s nickname is a slur, they have emerged as a potent symbol in the heated debate over the name of the more widely known Redskins — Washington’s NFL team. More than half the school’s 220 students eagerly accepted free tickets from the team for an Oct. 12 game near Phoenix, where they confronted Native American protesters who were there to condemn Washington’s moniker.

Brilliant move!

At the stadium, they were confronted by the bullies. I find this extremely revealing:

“We want to let our children know who are being used today,” she [Navajo anti-Redskins activist Amanda Blackhorse] said, “that we are here for them. We are not going to disparage them . . . because they don’t know any better. 

This crystalizes the arrogance of the bullies. They know better than everyone else how people should behave. And they will mobilize the power the media, the court, the regulatory agencies, and the heckler’s veto to tyrannize the rest of us.

88 percent of students and 71 percent of faculty members surveyed by the school this month favored keeping the Redskins name and mascot. On another question, 60 percent of students disagreed that Redskins is a slur, 7 percent said the word is offensive and one-third said they weren’t sure.

I commend the WaPo for at least publishing this view.

I don’t much care about the Redskins name, but I do care about bullying by the ruling class.  Telling Native Americans that you “know better” is classic liberal condescension and is far more offensive than the team name.

One of the most egregious and pervasive examples of the left wing ruling class exercising its cultural dominance is the vicious campaign to force the Washington Redskins football tram to abandon its historic name.  History and tradition are an intrinsic part of sports teams, and if the serfs can be forced to capitulate and abandon their beloved team name, then the door is opened to further cultural control being exercised with less resistance. It is in multiple senses a symbolic battle aimed at breaking the will of the American people.

The potentates of political correctness have declared the name “Redskins” is “hate speech.” The Washington Post editorial board self-righteously proclaimed it would no longer use the term on their editorial pages.

Gadfly lawyer John Banzhaf is petitioning the FCC to suspend the license of a Washington, DC area radio station owned by the proprietor of the Redskins for employing the term, potentially But these bullies do not speak for the Native Americans they pretend to represent. Surveys have demonstrated the vast majority of NAs are not offended by the term, while the team’s fans also want to keep it.

Even more dramatic is the use of the name “Redskins” by high school teams where a substantial majority or even all of the students are Native Americans. One such school is in Red Mesa, Arizona. The Washington Post news pages, which don’t suffer ubder the PC regime of the editorial board, visited the school and published a long and interesting article on the school, the team, and the feelings around the name the bullies can’t abide.

RED MESA, Ariz. — The fans poured into the bleachers on a Friday night, erupting in “Let’s go, Redskins!” chants that echoed across a new field of artificial turf, glowing green against a vast dun-colored landscape.

Inside the Red Mesa High School locker room, Ted Nugent’s “Stranglehold” blared on the stereo as players hurried to strap on their helmets and gather for a pregame prayer and pep talk.

“This is your time, right?” the team’s assistant coach demanded.

“Yes, sir!” the players shouted. “Redskins on three! Redskins on three! One, two, three, Redskins!”

The scene at this tiny, remote high school was as boisterous as it was remarkable: Nearly everyone on the field and in the bleachers belongs to the Navajo Nation. Most of the people in Red Mesa not only reject claims that their team’s nickname is a slur, they have emerged as a potent symbol in the heated debate over the name of the more widely known Redskins — Washington’s NFL team. More than half the school’s 220 students eagerly accepted free tickets from the team for an Oct. 12 game near Phoenix, where they confronted Native American protesters who were there to condemn Washington’s moniker.

Brilliant move!

At the stadium, they were confronted by the bullies. I find this extremely revealing:

“We want to let our children know who are being used today,” she [Navajo anti-Redskins activist Amanda Blackhorse] said, “that we are here for them. We are not going to disparage them . . . because they don’t know any better. 

This crystalizes the arrogance of the bullies. They know better than everyone else how people should behave. And they will mobilize the power the media, the court, the regulatory agencies, and the heckler’s veto to tyrannize the rest of us.

88 percent of students and 71 percent of faculty members surveyed by the school this month favored keeping the Redskins name and mascot. On another question, 60 percent of students disagreed that Redskins is a slur, 7 percent said the word is offensive and one-third said they weren’t sure.

I commend the WaPo for at least publishing this view.

I don’t much care about the Redskins name, but I do care about bullying by the ruling class.  Telling Native Americans that you “know better” is classic liberal condescension and is far more offensive than the team name.