Report: Republican Governors Association cutting back spending in support of Scott Walker re-election effort

Scott Walker is fighting for his political life in Wisconsin, tied with heiress Mary Burke in the Real Clear Politics average of polls.  Walker bravely took on the government employee unions, and won victories that have enabled people who don’t want to be forced into unions to stay out, and that have saved school districts millions. Allowing teachers and other government workers the freedom to not associate with Democrat-supporting unions has also crippled the money machine that launders payrolls into union dues, and then into Democratic Party political funds.

In other words, Scott Walker has taken the fight to the corrupt process that forces people to support political views they disagree with, and in the process has changed the power equation. For this reason, he is target number one among Republican governors.

This is why it is so distrubing to read this report by respected political reporters Stephen Hayes and John McCormack in The Weekly Standard, who write that it appears that, despite claims to the contrary, the Republican Governors Association, led by Chris Christie, is cutting back on spending for Walker’s reelection in the home stretch.

Robert Costa of the Washington Post reported that RGA officials told him “their original plan had been to spend about $900,000 on the Wisconsin airwaves in the campaign’s closing days. But after internal deliberations and tightening polls, that amount has been increased to $2 million.”

That’s pretty close to the opposite of what we were told.

Our “GOP source with knowledge of RGA spending” told us: “We have another $4-5 million in TV ad time reserved for these last two weeks.” So if the RGA is committing to just $2 million now – that’s not an increase over their original amount, as RGA officials told the Post, it would appear to be a significant reduction.

What's more, Wisconsin GOP sources dispute the RGA's claim to have spent $6 million to date, putting the figure at closer to $3 million.

This is disturbing, but not conclusive:

We'll have more clarity on this spending after the election, when final FEC reports are published. But even if we accept the RGA's new claim to the Postat face value--that they'll spend "$8 million in total in Wisconsin" by the end of the campaign--the RGA is now conceding that they are spending more on Michigan ($10 million to date) than Wisconsin.

Michigan is a bigger state in population, but GOP Governor Rick Snyder has a 5.6% lead in the RCP average of polls.

If Walker wins re-election, he could be a formidable challenger for the 2016 presidential nomination. He deserves the utmost support.

Scott Walker is fighting for his political life in Wisconsin, tied with heiress Mary Burke in the Real Clear Politics average of polls.  Walker bravely took on the government employee unions, and won victories that have enabled people who don’t want to be forced into unions to stay out, and that have saved school districts millions. Allowing teachers and other government workers the freedom to not associate with Democrat-supporting unions has also crippled the money machine that launders payrolls into union dues, and then into Democratic Party political funds.

In other words, Scott Walker has taken the fight to the corrupt process that forces people to support political views they disagree with, and in the process has changed the power equation. For this reason, he is target number one among Republican governors.

This is why it is so distrubing to read this report by respected political reporters Stephen Hayes and John McCormack in The Weekly Standard, who write that it appears that, despite claims to the contrary, the Republican Governors Association, led by Chris Christie, is cutting back on spending for Walker’s reelection in the home stretch.

Robert Costa of the Washington Post reported that RGA officials told him “their original plan had been to spend about $900,000 on the Wisconsin airwaves in the campaign’s closing days. But after internal deliberations and tightening polls, that amount has been increased to $2 million.”

That’s pretty close to the opposite of what we were told.

Our “GOP source with knowledge of RGA spending” told us: “We have another $4-5 million in TV ad time reserved for these last two weeks.” So if the RGA is committing to just $2 million now – that’s not an increase over their original amount, as RGA officials told the Post, it would appear to be a significant reduction.

What's more, Wisconsin GOP sources dispute the RGA's claim to have spent $6 million to date, putting the figure at closer to $3 million.

This is disturbing, but not conclusive:

We'll have more clarity on this spending after the election, when final FEC reports are published. But even if we accept the RGA's new claim to the Postat face value--that they'll spend "$8 million in total in Wisconsin" by the end of the campaign--the RGA is now conceding that they are spending more on Michigan ($10 million to date) than Wisconsin.

Michigan is a bigger state in population, but GOP Governor Rick Snyder has a 5.6% lead in the RCP average of polls.

If Walker wins re-election, he could be a formidable challenger for the 2016 presidential nomination. He deserves the utmost support.