Report: Iran ordered retaliation on Israel for Parchin blast

A huge explosion on Sunday at an Iranian military site suspected of being connected to their nuclear bomb program was an attack carried out by a foreign government. The report in a Kuwaiti newspaper also quotes American and Israeli sources saying that Tuesday's blast on the Israel-Lebanese border that killed two IDF soldiers was ordered by Tehran in retaliation for the blast.

The Iranian-backed terrorist group Hezb'allah took responsibility for the attack on Israel.

Haaretz:

The Kuwaiti newspaper reported on Friday that that the Parchin blast earlier in the week was an attack "by a foreign country," rather than an accident as presented by Iran.

It quoted European and American sources as saying that Iran had ordered Hezbollah to undertake Tuesday's bombing in retaliation for Parchin.

The A-Rai report has not been confirmed by any other sources.

Analysis of before and after satellite images of the Parchin military compound in Iran show the telltale signs of "damage consistent with an attack against bunkers in a central locality within the military research complex" analyst Ronen Solomon wrote in a report in Israel Defense this week.

According to Solomon's report, the effects of a large explosion in the center of the complex can be clearly seen in satellite images.

On Monday, an Iranian defense industry told Iranian news agency IRNA that two workers were killed in a fire at an explosives factory in an eastern district of Tehran.

An Iranian opposition website, Saham, described the incident as a strong explosion and said it took place near Iran's sprawling Parchin military facility, which is located around 30 kilometers (19 miles) southeast of the capital. It did not give a source for its report, which could not be independently verified.

The Parchin military facility where the blast occurred has long been suspected of being a primary location of Iran's nuclear bomb efforts. Some experts say that the blast revealed evidence for the first time that Iran has not stopped trying to build the bomb.

Fox News:

Parchin, a site to which international inspectors have repeatedly been denied access since 2007 – a fact that many opponents of the P5+1 talks have long insisted in itself makes a mockery of the so-called negotiation process – is rumored to be the location of the development of the key warhead components required for making a nuclear bomb.

“Western officials suspect that at the heart of this secret development is the weapon group developing the nuclear lens mechanism,” Bergman said. “It's a complex system of timers and explosives assembled around the core of the bomb, which explode in a way that "pushes" the enriched uranium sphere inwards and starts the chain reaction needed for an atomic explosion. If the smoking gun for the existence of the weapon group is found, it will serve as decisive evidence that Iran has been lying and that there is no point in negotiating with it.”

The assassination of a series of Iranian nuclear scientists inside Iran in recent years as the result of bombs planted on, or next to their vehicles by mysterious motorcycle-riding hitmen, together with the vicious Stuxnet computer virus that hit Iran’s key Natanz nuclear facility in 2010, has allegedly put the brakes on the Islamic Republic’s nuclear project.

While unverified, the charge that Iran thinks Israel is responsible makes sense in the context of Hezb'allah's attack on Tuesday.

It's unknown how much Iran's nuke program has been set back. But as long as western nations march toward inking an agreement that would allow Iran to continue its nuclear program, it won't matter in the long run.

A huge explosion on Sunday at an Iranian military site suspected of being connected to their nuclear bomb program was an attack carried out by a foreign government. The report in a Kuwaiti newspaper also quotes American and Israeli sources saying that Tuesday's blast on the Israel-Lebanese border that killed two IDF soldiers was ordered by Tehran in retaliation for the blast.

The Iranian-backed terrorist group Hezb'allah took responsibility for the attack on Israel.

Haaretz:

The Kuwaiti newspaper reported on Friday that that the Parchin blast earlier in the week was an attack "by a foreign country," rather than an accident as presented by Iran.

It quoted European and American sources as saying that Iran had ordered Hezbollah to undertake Tuesday's bombing in retaliation for Parchin.

The A-Rai report has not been confirmed by any other sources.

Analysis of before and after satellite images of the Parchin military compound in Iran show the telltale signs of "damage consistent with an attack against bunkers in a central locality within the military research complex" analyst Ronen Solomon wrote in a report in Israel Defense this week.

According to Solomon's report, the effects of a large explosion in the center of the complex can be clearly seen in satellite images.

On Monday, an Iranian defense industry told Iranian news agency IRNA that two workers were killed in a fire at an explosives factory in an eastern district of Tehran.

An Iranian opposition website, Saham, described the incident as a strong explosion and said it took place near Iran's sprawling Parchin military facility, which is located around 30 kilometers (19 miles) southeast of the capital. It did not give a source for its report, which could not be independently verified.

The Parchin military facility where the blast occurred has long been suspected of being a primary location of Iran's nuclear bomb efforts. Some experts say that the blast revealed evidence for the first time that Iran has not stopped trying to build the bomb.

Fox News:

Parchin, a site to which international inspectors have repeatedly been denied access since 2007 – a fact that many opponents of the P5+1 talks have long insisted in itself makes a mockery of the so-called negotiation process – is rumored to be the location of the development of the key warhead components required for making a nuclear bomb.

“Western officials suspect that at the heart of this secret development is the weapon group developing the nuclear lens mechanism,” Bergman said. “It's a complex system of timers and explosives assembled around the core of the bomb, which explode in a way that "pushes" the enriched uranium sphere inwards and starts the chain reaction needed for an atomic explosion. If the smoking gun for the existence of the weapon group is found, it will serve as decisive evidence that Iran has been lying and that there is no point in negotiating with it.”

The assassination of a series of Iranian nuclear scientists inside Iran in recent years as the result of bombs planted on, or next to their vehicles by mysterious motorcycle-riding hitmen, together with the vicious Stuxnet computer virus that hit Iran’s key Natanz nuclear facility in 2010, has allegedly put the brakes on the Islamic Republic’s nuclear project.

While unverified, the charge that Iran thinks Israel is responsible makes sense in the context of Hezb'allah's attack on Tuesday.

It's unknown how much Iran's nuke program has been set back. But as long as western nations march toward inking an agreement that would allow Iran to continue its nuclear program, it won't matter in the long run.