Producer of anti-Obamacare movie hit with IRS audit

The producer of an anti-Obamacare movie has become the latest apparent conservative target of the IRS.

Logan Clements. producer of "Sick and Sicker" put out a press release that said for the first time in his life, the IRS was auditing his tax returns.

Washington Times:

The news comes one month after the conservative Breitbart News announced that it, too, was being audited and that the action was probably politically motivated.

Mr. Clements‘ movie makes the case that Obamacare will eventually lead to socialized medicine like Canada.

In the video, he says the IRS is demanding a “ridiculously long list” of documents, including “a detailed description of all transactions related to all prior year returns and supporting documentation.”

“It sounds like a fishing expedition by the IRS to tie me up for a very long time in retaliation for making a movie against Obamacare,” Mr. Clements says. “Perhaps they were hoping that voters wouldn’t see my movie before the election by keeping me tied up in a battle with the IRS. Well, in fact, their action is going to have the complete opposite effect.”

The conservative vowed to fight back by releasing “Sick and Sicker” immediately to entire states online using a “statewide open screening license,” in order to get the message out before Nov. 4.

It isn't just Brietbart and Clements. Anecdotal evidence suggests that some big donors to the GOP have also come in for some unwelcome scrutiny by the IRS.

Is it politics? VIndictiveness? Or both? There has been testimony before Congress from individual taxpayers that the harder they fought back against IRS harrassment, the more vindictive the agency became. The conservative attack on the IRS for its targeting of Tea Party and other activist groups has led to a spate of audits that could easily be seen as politically motivated. But is the IRS defending itself, or the Obama administration? Absent hard evidence of coordination, we can't say for sure. But it's suspicious enough that Congress should add the possible use of the IRS to intimidate administration opponents with intrusive audits to its list of investigations.


 

 

The producer of an anti-Obamacare movie has become the latest apparent conservative target of the IRS.

Logan Clements. producer of "Sick and Sicker" put out a press release that said for the first time in his life, the IRS was auditing his tax returns.

Washington Times:

The news comes one month after the conservative Breitbart News announced that it, too, was being audited and that the action was probably politically motivated.

Mr. Clements‘ movie makes the case that Obamacare will eventually lead to socialized medicine like Canada.

In the video, he says the IRS is demanding a “ridiculously long list” of documents, including “a detailed description of all transactions related to all prior year returns and supporting documentation.”

“It sounds like a fishing expedition by the IRS to tie me up for a very long time in retaliation for making a movie against Obamacare,” Mr. Clements says. “Perhaps they were hoping that voters wouldn’t see my movie before the election by keeping me tied up in a battle with the IRS. Well, in fact, their action is going to have the complete opposite effect.”

The conservative vowed to fight back by releasing “Sick and Sicker” immediately to entire states online using a “statewide open screening license,” in order to get the message out before Nov. 4.

It isn't just Brietbart and Clements. Anecdotal evidence suggests that some big donors to the GOP have also come in for some unwelcome scrutiny by the IRS.

Is it politics? VIndictiveness? Or both? There has been testimony before Congress from individual taxpayers that the harder they fought back against IRS harrassment, the more vindictive the agency became. The conservative attack on the IRS for its targeting of Tea Party and other activist groups has led to a spate of audits that could easily be seen as politically motivated. But is the IRS defending itself, or the Obama administration? Absent hard evidence of coordination, we can't say for sure. But it's suspicious enough that Congress should add the possible use of the IRS to intimidate administration opponents with intrusive audits to its list of investigations.