Politico poll: 'Strong disapproval' of Obama and anxiety over Ebola, Islamic State

Two thirds of likely voters in a poll conducted by Politico, believe that events in the US are "out of control" and that the government is not up to meeting challenges.

Also, 37% "strongly disapprove" of the president while only 12% "strongly approve."

The public distress manifests itself across a range of issues:

- Terrorism: Eighty-four percent of voters say the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant poses a “serious” threat to the U.S. homeland, including 43 percent who say it poses a “very serious” threat. Just 12 percent said the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, is not a serious concern.

- Health care: Most voters believe their health care costs will go up under the Affordable Care Act. Fifty-seven percent said they believe their personal costs will increase, while only 7 percent said they will decrease. A third said their costs would remain the same. (At the same time, support for repealing Obamacare has continued to drop, now down to 41 percent.)

- Presidential management: Voters in the midterm battleground states are evenly split on whether President Barack Obama or George W. Bush was more effective at managing the federal government. Thirty-eighty percent named Bush, while 35 percent preferred Obama. A quarter of respondents said the two men were equally competent.

- Ebola: Only 22 percent of respondents said they had a lot of confidence that the government is doing everything it can to contain the contagious disease. Thirty-nine percent they had some confidence, while a third said they had little or no confidence. The poll concluded Oct. 11, before the hospitalization of the second nurse who treated an Ebola patient in Dallas.

But all is not peaches and cream for the GOP either. Republican approval among voters is still at historic lows while they trail badly in some key demographic groups:

Republicans appear likely to prevail in many of the hardest-fought races of the year and stand a good chance of taking control of the Senate. In the bigger picture, however, there is little to indicate that the GOP has rehabilitated itself in the eyes of voters since its setbacks in the 2012 presidential election.

The Republican Party continue to trail heavily among young and nonwhite voters, losing Hispanics by 25 points, African-Americans by 74 points, women by 5 points and every age group of voters under 65.

But the GOP maintains important leads among whites (12 points), voters over 65 (12 points) and men (4 points) — advantages that are likely to prove decisive on a midterm electoral map tilted toward less diverse and more conservative states in the South and Mountain West.

Voters disapprove of congressional Republicans by a 40-point margin, 70 percent to 30 percent, including 38 percent who strongly disapprove of the Hill GOP. For Democrats, the numbers are only a bit better: 61 percent disapprove and 38 percent approve.

This would appear to be an election where issues matter less than hating on the party in power. If the GOP takes the Senate and expands its lead in the House, they have a pile of work to do before 2016 to regain the trust of voters that they can manage the government better than the Democrats.


 

 

Two thirds of likely voters in a poll conducted by Politico, believe that events in the US are "out of control" and that the government is not up to meeting challenges.

Also, 37% "strongly disapprove" of the president while only 12% "strongly approve."

The public distress manifests itself across a range of issues:

- Terrorism: Eighty-four percent of voters say the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant poses a “serious” threat to the U.S. homeland, including 43 percent who say it poses a “very serious” threat. Just 12 percent said the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, is not a serious concern.

- Health care: Most voters believe their health care costs will go up under the Affordable Care Act. Fifty-seven percent said they believe their personal costs will increase, while only 7 percent said they will decrease. A third said their costs would remain the same. (At the same time, support for repealing Obamacare has continued to drop, now down to 41 percent.)

- Presidential management: Voters in the midterm battleground states are evenly split on whether President Barack Obama or George W. Bush was more effective at managing the federal government. Thirty-eighty percent named Bush, while 35 percent preferred Obama. A quarter of respondents said the two men were equally competent.

- Ebola: Only 22 percent of respondents said they had a lot of confidence that the government is doing everything it can to contain the contagious disease. Thirty-nine percent they had some confidence, while a third said they had little or no confidence. The poll concluded Oct. 11, before the hospitalization of the second nurse who treated an Ebola patient in Dallas.

But all is not peaches and cream for the GOP either. Republican approval among voters is still at historic lows while they trail badly in some key demographic groups:

Republicans appear likely to prevail in many of the hardest-fought races of the year and stand a good chance of taking control of the Senate. In the bigger picture, however, there is little to indicate that the GOP has rehabilitated itself in the eyes of voters since its setbacks in the 2012 presidential election.

The Republican Party continue to trail heavily among young and nonwhite voters, losing Hispanics by 25 points, African-Americans by 74 points, women by 5 points and every age group of voters under 65.

But the GOP maintains important leads among whites (12 points), voters over 65 (12 points) and men (4 points) — advantages that are likely to prove decisive on a midterm electoral map tilted toward less diverse and more conservative states in the South and Mountain West.

Voters disapprove of congressional Republicans by a 40-point margin, 70 percent to 30 percent, including 38 percent who strongly disapprove of the Hill GOP. For Democrats, the numbers are only a bit better: 61 percent disapprove and 38 percent approve.

This would appear to be an election where issues matter less than hating on the party in power. If the GOP takes the Senate and expands its lead in the House, they have a pile of work to do before 2016 to regain the trust of voters that they can manage the government better than the Democrats.