New York Times and Bill Clinton reveal Hillary's election game plan

The basic outline of Hillary Clinton’s campaign appeal for the presidency is taking shape, revealed by her husband, and faithfully elaborated by the court scribes of the New York Times. That paper’s Amy Chozick  covers what the 42nd president has been saying on the campaign trail, stumping for Democrats and building IOUs for his wife to cash in.

The first obstacle Hillary faces is separating herself from the many failures of the Obama presidency, and by extension, of big government itself. This is especially tricky because she will need the black base of the Democratic Party to turn out in comparable numbers for her as they did for the First Black President. Bill, far more skilled and nuanced than she could ever be, is setting up the argument for her. Chozick writes:

 The president’s supporters say the toxic atmosphere in Washington has made it impossible for Mr. Obama to succeed.

But there is a counter view being offered by a former Democratic president that as far as personal attacks go, he, Bill Clinton, had it worse. “Nobody’s accused him of murder yet, as far as I know. I mean, it was pretty rough back then,” Mr. Clinton said last month in an interview aired by PBS, when asked about the partisan climate facing Mr. Obama.

Whatever Mr. Clinton’s motivations, his comments, which his former aides frequently refer to when the topic comes up, do not permit Mr. Obama to excuse his legislative setbacks by simply citing hyper-partisanship. As one former White House aide to Mr. Clinton put it: “They impeached our guy.”

This approach places all the onus on conservatives and Republicans for their partisanship and divisiveness, and allows Mr. (and Mrs.) Clinton to present themselves as capable of overcoming it. Left unsaid by the Clintons, but sure to be used by countless black supporters of the Democrats, is that racism is responsible for Obama’s failures, and that is why Mrs. Clinton can overcome the opposition, as Obama never could.

We have seen this blame-the-conservatives strategy already trotted out by Monica Lewinsky, when she claimed this week that she was “bullied” by Matt Drudge, this placing responsibility for her troubles not on the boss who seduced her and then had his wife defame her (loony-toons”), but on this who reported the truth about her defilement of the Oval Office.

Chozick, for her part, pushes another part of the Democratic strategy:

 Congressional Republicans, of course, have also refused to reach across the aisle and work with Mr. Obama the way they did in Mr. Lott’s era. The current Congress is on track to become one of the least legislatively productive in recent history. That is partly because Mr. Obama faces a far more polarized electorate than Mr. Clinton did.

On Planet Chozick, the legislation passed by the House and then killed without even a vote in the Senate by Harry Reid do not merit any mention at all. It is the Republicans’ fault, and also those nasty extremists. Unspoken is the assumption that more laws are the solution to what ails us.

Chozick finds a liberal academic to make the point about racism that the strategy needs to succeed:

Some of the venom directed at Mr. Obama has a racial component that Mr. Clinton, a relatable white Southerner, never had to deal with, said Douglas G. Brinkley, a presidential historian and professor at Rice University. “The Clintons created huge problems of their own making,” Mr. Brinkley added, while “Obama’s problem is that he bullheadedly pushed Obamacare, and he happens to be African-American.”

So watch Hillary proclaim herself a “healer,” able to “get things done,” and able to ride out obstruction from those nasty Republicans, in a way that racism prevented President Obama from doing.

That’s the game plan. We are forewarned.

The basic outline of Hillary Clinton’s campaign appeal for the presidency is taking shape, revealed by her husband, and faithfully elaborated by the court scribes of the New York Times. That paper’s Amy Chozick  covers what the 42nd president has been saying on the campaign trail, stumping for Democrats and building IOUs for his wife to cash in.

The first obstacle Hillary faces is separating herself from the many failures of the Obama presidency, and by extension, of big government itself. This is especially tricky because she will need the black base of the Democratic Party to turn out in comparable numbers for her as they did for the First Black President. Bill, far more skilled and nuanced than she could ever be, is setting up the argument for her. Chozick writes:

 The president’s supporters say the toxic atmosphere in Washington has made it impossible for Mr. Obama to succeed.

But there is a counter view being offered by a former Democratic president that as far as personal attacks go, he, Bill Clinton, had it worse. “Nobody’s accused him of murder yet, as far as I know. I mean, it was pretty rough back then,” Mr. Clinton said last month in an interview aired by PBS, when asked about the partisan climate facing Mr. Obama.

Whatever Mr. Clinton’s motivations, his comments, which his former aides frequently refer to when the topic comes up, do not permit Mr. Obama to excuse his legislative setbacks by simply citing hyper-partisanship. As one former White House aide to Mr. Clinton put it: “They impeached our guy.”

This approach places all the onus on conservatives and Republicans for their partisanship and divisiveness, and allows Mr. (and Mrs.) Clinton to present themselves as capable of overcoming it. Left unsaid by the Clintons, but sure to be used by countless black supporters of the Democrats, is that racism is responsible for Obama’s failures, and that is why Mrs. Clinton can overcome the opposition, as Obama never could.

We have seen this blame-the-conservatives strategy already trotted out by Monica Lewinsky, when she claimed this week that she was “bullied” by Matt Drudge, this placing responsibility for her troubles not on the boss who seduced her and then had his wife defame her (loony-toons”), but on this who reported the truth about her defilement of the Oval Office.

Chozick, for her part, pushes another part of the Democratic strategy:

 Congressional Republicans, of course, have also refused to reach across the aisle and work with Mr. Obama the way they did in Mr. Lott’s era. The current Congress is on track to become one of the least legislatively productive in recent history. That is partly because Mr. Obama faces a far more polarized electorate than Mr. Clinton did.

On Planet Chozick, the legislation passed by the House and then killed without even a vote in the Senate by Harry Reid do not merit any mention at all. It is the Republicans’ fault, and also those nasty extremists. Unspoken is the assumption that more laws are the solution to what ails us.

Chozick finds a liberal academic to make the point about racism that the strategy needs to succeed:

Some of the venom directed at Mr. Obama has a racial component that Mr. Clinton, a relatable white Southerner, never had to deal with, said Douglas G. Brinkley, a presidential historian and professor at Rice University. “The Clintons created huge problems of their own making,” Mr. Brinkley added, while “Obama’s problem is that he bullheadedly pushed Obamacare, and he happens to be African-American.”

So watch Hillary proclaim herself a “healer,” able to “get things done,” and able to ride out obstruction from those nasty Republicans, in a way that racism prevented President Obama from doing.

That’s the game plan. We are forewarned.