New York cops apparently not briefed on how to dispose of Ebola bio-hazard waste

How prepared is New York city to handle Ebola? The cops certainly aren't.

Police who sealed off the Harlem apartment of Dr. Craig Spencer after he was taken to the hospital have apparently not been taught the proper way to dispose of potential bio hazardous material.

While they geared up to enter the apartment and cordon it off, they ended up throwing their gloves, masks, and police tape into a public garbage receptacle.

Sheesh.

The Daily Mail:

With the news that the first confirmed case of Ebola has hit New York City, all attention now turns to how equipped the densely populated metropolis is to deal with the deadly virus - and if the city really is as prepared as they claimed to be in a press conference Thursday evening.

Perhaps throwing things into doubt are photos taken outside the Harlem apartment of Dr. Craig Spencer, who was admitted to the hospital with a 103 degree fever earlier today. They show police officers tossing their gloves, masks and the caution tape used to block off access to his apartment in a public trash can.

Is that really the best place to be putting all of that?

The photos and video, all shot before Spencer's Ebola was actually confirmed, do not show whether these officers actually entered his building. 

However, some are suggesting that for the sake of safety - not to mention public sanity - it would have made sense to discard of these masks and gloves and tape in a biohazard bag.

Or, at the very least, a trash can not located on a busy city sidewalk.

The chances of getting Ebola by touching police tape are very low. But when you're dealing with a disease with a 70% mortality rate, you would think normal prudence and common sense would have you being extremely cautious about disposing of anything that may have been exposed to Dr. Spencer.

In their effort to appear competent and in control of the situation by downplaying the risks of catching the disease, authorities have made the situation worse. Pictures of New York cops casually disposing of a potential bio hazard doesn't instill much confidence in their efforts at managing the crisis.


 

How prepared is New York city to handle Ebola? The cops certainly aren't.

Police who sealed off the Harlem apartment of Dr. Craig Spencer after he was taken to the hospital have apparently not been taught the proper way to dispose of potential bio hazardous material.

While they geared up to enter the apartment and cordon it off, they ended up throwing their gloves, masks, and police tape into a public garbage receptacle.

Sheesh.

The Daily Mail:

With the news that the first confirmed case of Ebola has hit New York City, all attention now turns to how equipped the densely populated metropolis is to deal with the deadly virus - and if the city really is as prepared as they claimed to be in a press conference Thursday evening.

Perhaps throwing things into doubt are photos taken outside the Harlem apartment of Dr. Craig Spencer, who was admitted to the hospital with a 103 degree fever earlier today. They show police officers tossing their gloves, masks and the caution tape used to block off access to his apartment in a public trash can.

Is that really the best place to be putting all of that?

The photos and video, all shot before Spencer's Ebola was actually confirmed, do not show whether these officers actually entered his building. 

However, some are suggesting that for the sake of safety - not to mention public sanity - it would have made sense to discard of these masks and gloves and tape in a biohazard bag.

Or, at the very least, a trash can not located on a busy city sidewalk.

The chances of getting Ebola by touching police tape are very low. But when you're dealing with a disease with a 70% mortality rate, you would think normal prudence and common sense would have you being extremely cautious about disposing of anything that may have been exposed to Dr. Spencer.

In their effort to appear competent and in control of the situation by downplaying the risks of catching the disease, authorities have made the situation worse. Pictures of New York cops casually disposing of a potential bio hazard doesn't instill much confidence in their efforts at managing the crisis.