House to vote on Bergdahl resolution next week

A resolution condemning President Obama's illegal swap of 4 terrorists for the release of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl will receive a vote next week, according to The Hill:

The House is expected to vote next week on a resolution condemning the Obama administration for not giving Congress advance notice before exchanging Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl for five Taliban prisoners.

GOP aides said that the resolution sponsored by Rep. Scott Rigell (R-Va.) is planned for floor consideration in the House's first week back in session after the five-week August recess.

The administration is required by law to notify Congress at least 30 days ahead of time before transferring prisoners housed at the Guantánamo Bay detention facility. President Obama said after the transfer took place that giving Congress a heads-up could have jeopardized the deal with the Taliban to free the American prisoner of war.

The resolution expresses "grave concern" that releasing the five senior Taliban commanders raised national security risks.

Additionally, it argues that the exchange harmed the administration's working relationships with the legislative branch, stating that "these actions have burdened unnecessarily the trust and confidence in the commitment and ability of the Obama administration to constructively engage and work with Congress."

The House Rules Committee will meet Monday evening to prepare the resolution for a floor vote. A vote could come as soon as Tuesday.

The Government Accountability Office ruled last month that the president broke the law when he made the swap. So, a resolution condemning the action would seem to be a small price to pay for ignoring Congress.

In fact, the resolution has limited value as a symbolic act since the Senate will never consider the measure. But this is something we better get used to, even if Republicans take over the Senate in November.

A Republican Congress is likely to pass a lot of legislation that the president wouldn't sign in a million years. But by making a clear record - as with the Bergdahl resolution - the president will be cast in the role as obstructionist. Flipping political field position in this way will play into the GOP's hands in 2016.

 


 

 

A resolution condemning President Obama's illegal swap of 4 terrorists for the release of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl will receive a vote next week, according to The Hill:

The House is expected to vote next week on a resolution condemning the Obama administration for not giving Congress advance notice before exchanging Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl for five Taliban prisoners.

GOP aides said that the resolution sponsored by Rep. Scott Rigell (R-Va.) is planned for floor consideration in the House's first week back in session after the five-week August recess.

The administration is required by law to notify Congress at least 30 days ahead of time before transferring prisoners housed at the Guantánamo Bay detention facility. President Obama said after the transfer took place that giving Congress a heads-up could have jeopardized the deal with the Taliban to free the American prisoner of war.

The resolution expresses "grave concern" that releasing the five senior Taliban commanders raised national security risks.

Additionally, it argues that the exchange harmed the administration's working relationships with the legislative branch, stating that "these actions have burdened unnecessarily the trust and confidence in the commitment and ability of the Obama administration to constructively engage and work with Congress."

The House Rules Committee will meet Monday evening to prepare the resolution for a floor vote. A vote could come as soon as Tuesday.

The Government Accountability Office ruled last month that the president broke the law when he made the swap. So, a resolution condemning the action would seem to be a small price to pay for ignoring Congress.

In fact, the resolution has limited value as a symbolic act since the Senate will never consider the measure. But this is something we better get used to, even if Republicans take over the Senate in November.

A Republican Congress is likely to pass a lot of legislation that the president wouldn't sign in a million years. But by making a clear record - as with the Bergdahl resolution - the president will be cast in the role as obstructionist. Flipping political field position in this way will play into the GOP's hands in 2016.