So goes Chicago, so goes New York?

In New York City, in one eight hour period on Saturday, 15 people were shot, with two dead. Those are Chicago-like numbers. And New Yorkers may be wondering if the more lenient policies of Mayor Bill de Blasio are to blame.

Fifteen people were shot in a rash of violence in New York City.

The violence left two people dead and 13 others injured within a span of just 8 hours.

The NYPD reported the first shooting late Saturday.  It happened at an East Harlem Park.

In that incident, 3 people were shot, with one of the victims being seriously injured, at Jefferson Park on 113th Street and First Avenue; Shortly before 3 a.m.

On Sunday, 2 people were shot dead in Hamilton Heights when a driver got out of his car and opened fire.

The motorist fled after killing a 21-year-old and a 29-year-old man.

A man in his 20s was shot on West 128th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue in Harlem at around 1 a.m.

A 19-year-old man was shot on Lewis Avenue and Van Buren Street in Bedford-Stuyvesant at around 2 a.m. And a 26-year-old was shot at Sutter Avenue and Pennsylvania Avenue in East New York at around 5:30 a.m.

3 people were shot in the Mott Haven section of the Bronx around 3 a.m. Sunday.

A 19-year-old and a 24-year-old were both shot in the arm and a 29-year-old was shot in the thigh. The three victims are expected to survive.

In the South Jamaica section of Queens at around 6 a.m. Sunday, 4 people were shot when two men got out of a car and fired more than 20 rounds. Two of them are in critical condition.

The city's "Stop and Frisk" policy has been reformed, although many believe that as a crime fighting weapon, it left much to be desired. And de Blasio has continued the "broken windows" policing strategy that began under Mayor Rudy Guiliani.

Most of the mayor's planned reforms that emphasizes community policing have not been implemented. Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel tried something similar and saw the murder rate skyrocket. In New York, paradoxically, the number of shootings has spiked by 13% but homicides are on pace to hit a 50 year low.

It would be hard to place the blame on Mayor de Blasio for this spate of violence. And the city has a long way to go to mimic Chicago, where the weekend carnage was 7 dead, 19 wounded.

But de Blasio is extremely vulnerable on the crime issue, given his loud advocacy for police reforms during his campaign. He's going to have to prove that reforming the police won't lead to more crime.

In New York City, in one eight hour period on Saturday, 15 people were shot, with two dead. Those are Chicago-like numbers. And New Yorkers may be wondering if the more lenient policies of Mayor Bill de Blasio are to blame.

Fifteen people were shot in a rash of violence in New York City.

The violence left two people dead and 13 others injured within a span of just 8 hours.

The NYPD reported the first shooting late Saturday.  It happened at an East Harlem Park.

In that incident, 3 people were shot, with one of the victims being seriously injured, at Jefferson Park on 113th Street and First Avenue; Shortly before 3 a.m.

On Sunday, 2 people were shot dead in Hamilton Heights when a driver got out of his car and opened fire.

The motorist fled after killing a 21-year-old and a 29-year-old man.

A man in his 20s was shot on West 128th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue in Harlem at around 1 a.m.

A 19-year-old man was shot on Lewis Avenue and Van Buren Street in Bedford-Stuyvesant at around 2 a.m. And a 26-year-old was shot at Sutter Avenue and Pennsylvania Avenue in East New York at around 5:30 a.m.

3 people were shot in the Mott Haven section of the Bronx around 3 a.m. Sunday.

A 19-year-old and a 24-year-old were both shot in the arm and a 29-year-old was shot in the thigh. The three victims are expected to survive.

In the South Jamaica section of Queens at around 6 a.m. Sunday, 4 people were shot when two men got out of a car and fired more than 20 rounds. Two of them are in critical condition.

The city's "Stop and Frisk" policy has been reformed, although many believe that as a crime fighting weapon, it left much to be desired. And de Blasio has continued the "broken windows" policing strategy that began under Mayor Rudy Guiliani.

Most of the mayor's planned reforms that emphasizes community policing have not been implemented. Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel tried something similar and saw the murder rate skyrocket. In New York, paradoxically, the number of shootings has spiked by 13% but homicides are on pace to hit a 50 year low.

It would be hard to place the blame on Mayor de Blasio for this spate of violence. And the city has a long way to go to mimic Chicago, where the weekend carnage was 7 dead, 19 wounded.

But de Blasio is extremely vulnerable on the crime issue, given his loud advocacy for police reforms during his campaign. He's going to have to prove that reforming the police won't lead to more crime.