Dem Senate candidate may not vote for Reid as majority leader

How much trouble is Georgia Democratic Senate candidate Michelle Nunn in?

Nunn says that if she's elected, she may not vote for Harry Reid for majority leader.

The Hill:

Georgia Democrat Michelle Nunn won't commit to voting for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) if she wins her Senate race.

"I look forward to changing the composition in the leadership of the Senate. The way that we’re going to change Washington is to bring more people to recognize — to have the humility to recognize — that there are good ideas on both sides of the aisle," Nunn told reporters following a forum with her opponent, businessman David Perdue (R).

"I will vote for the Democratic leader that I think best represents our capacity to get things done and move things forward," she continued.

Nunn has trailed Perdue in recent polls of the race, and the comments seem squarely aimed at putting distance between herself and national Democrats in red-leaning Georgia. Nunn has sought to paint herself as a centrist deal-maker unhappy with both parties, while Perdue has tried to tie her to Reid and President Obama throughout the campaign.

It also seems more a campaign ploy than anything else — no Democrat is expected to challenge Reid as party leader and, as Republicans point out, Reid has been highly complimentary of Nunn.

Recent polls have Republican David Perdue pulling away, so Nunn's desperation to separate herself from the twin tar babies of Reid and Obama seems pretty clear. This sort of thing rarely works, which is why it's considered something of a hail mary pass.
 
A tiger can't change his stripes nor can a politician pretend they don't belong to an  unpopular party headed up by unpopular leaders. What was once thought to be a possible Democratic pick-up is looking more and more like a safe Republican seat.
 

How much trouble is Georgia Democratic Senate candidate Michelle Nunn in?

Nunn says that if she's elected, she may not vote for Harry Reid for majority leader.

The Hill:

Georgia Democrat Michelle Nunn won't commit to voting for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) if she wins her Senate race.

"I look forward to changing the composition in the leadership of the Senate. The way that we’re going to change Washington is to bring more people to recognize — to have the humility to recognize — that there are good ideas on both sides of the aisle," Nunn told reporters following a forum with her opponent, businessman David Perdue (R).

"I will vote for the Democratic leader that I think best represents our capacity to get things done and move things forward," she continued.

Nunn has trailed Perdue in recent polls of the race, and the comments seem squarely aimed at putting distance between herself and national Democrats in red-leaning Georgia. Nunn has sought to paint herself as a centrist deal-maker unhappy with both parties, while Perdue has tried to tie her to Reid and President Obama throughout the campaign.

It also seems more a campaign ploy than anything else — no Democrat is expected to challenge Reid as party leader and, as Republicans point out, Reid has been highly complimentary of Nunn.

Recent polls have Republican David Perdue pulling away, so Nunn's desperation to separate herself from the twin tar babies of Reid and Obama seems pretty clear. This sort of thing rarely works, which is why it's considered something of a hail mary pass.
 
A tiger can't change his stripes nor can a politician pretend they don't belong to an  unpopular party headed up by unpopular leaders. What was once thought to be a possible Democratic pick-up is looking more and more like a safe Republican seat.