Toronto Will Feel Like North Miami During the Summer by 2100?

A Canadian media outlet – Canada.com – has a story by Lauren Strapagiel stating that "Toronto will feel like North Miami by 2100."  The article uses data from Climate Central, whose predictions for summertime temperatures in the late 21st century appear to be a fantasy if historical trends – and their non-relation to atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations – are any indication.

The prediction is significant, given that Toronto is now the fifth largest urban area in North America, behind only Mexico City, New York, LA, and Chicago.

And here are the historical summer high temperatures for Toronto dating back to the year 1900.

A regression analysis on this data yields an almost perfectly flat line, and there is no chance of a significant increasing trend in Toronto's summer high temperatures since 1900.

In short, there is absolutely no long-term correlation between summertime temperatures in Canada's largest city and atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.

A Canadian media outlet – Canada.com – has a story by Lauren Strapagiel stating that "Toronto will feel like North Miami by 2100."  The article uses data from Climate Central, whose predictions for summertime temperatures in the late 21st century appear to be a fantasy if historical trends – and their non-relation to atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations – are any indication.

The prediction is significant, given that Toronto is now the fifth largest urban area in North America, behind only Mexico City, New York, LA, and Chicago.

And here are the historical summer high temperatures for Toronto dating back to the year 1900.

A regression analysis on this data yields an almost perfectly flat line, and there is no chance of a significant increasing trend in Toronto's summer high temperatures since 1900.

In short, there is absolutely no long-term correlation between summertime temperatures in Canada's largest city and atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.