GOP rejecting Obama's border funding request

Republicans in the House and Senate have voted thumbs down on President Obama's request for $3.8 billion to deal with the crisis on our southern border. Most lawmakers think it's too much money and not enough funds earmarked for border security.

Washington Times:

Even Texas Gov. Rick Perry, personally recruited by the president to persuade Republicans to support the measure, threw cold water on the idea. He said the president doesn’t need that much money and instead should send National Guard troops to secure the border.

The apparent defeat caps a whirlwind several days for the White House, which responded to increasing calls for action — and criticism of Mr. Obama for his decision not to visit the border while fundraising in Texas last week — by seeking more spending.

Republican leaders such as Mr. Perry also have put the request into a larger context, noting that Mr. Obama allowed the problem to worsen over the past five years, then responded to public pressure by demanding that Congress pass his supplemental spending plan immediately.

“It is a very large amount of money, and as you analyze it, very little of it is for border security. And I think until he gets realistic about the problem and how you deal with the problem — and it is a border security issue. And we’ve got a track record now of five-plus years of him disregarding what’s going on on the border,” Mr. Perry said on “Fox News Sunday.”

“So here’s his opportunity to truly lead. Don’t blame this on anyone. Be a leader. Lay out a plan. And I will suggest to you, actually, the president doesn’t have to have this big amount of money,” the Texan said.

After meeting with Mr. Perry last week, the president personally pitched the $3.7 billion plan during a hastily arranged press conference in Dallas.

The money would be used for detaining and deporting illegal immigrant families, transporting unaccompanied children back to their home countries, greater law enforcement, housing services for children, the hiring of more immigration judges and other purposes.

In his plea, Mr. Obama suggested that the only reason for Republican opposition would be politics.

“Are folks more interested in politics or are they more interested in solving the problem? If they’re interested in solving the problem, then this can be solved. If the preference is for politics, then it won’t be solved,” he said. “This is just a very narrow issue, the supplemental, in terms of dealing with the particular problem we have right now.”

Only the most determined open borders advocate knows that this is a problem with border security. It's a no brainer in that respect and the president isn't fooling anyone by accusing Republicans of "playing politics" when his funding measure fails the most rudimentary test of safeguarding the border.
 
Specifically, why do we need funds to return these kids to their homes when the chances that they will show up for a deportation hearing are slim to none? We are releasing these children all over the country and the thought that anyone will be able to keep track of them is absurd.
 
Funds may be needed to care for these kids until we can change the law and deport them, but as it has been pointed out elsewhere, we could spend a fraction of the $3.8 billion to fly them home now.
 
Republicans should offer their own alternative that would fund border protection and change the law so we can quickly deport these kids as fast as they come in. That would "solve" the problem quicker than spending funds to disperse them throughout the country.

Republicans in the House and Senate have voted thumbs down on President Obama's request for $3.8 billion to deal with the crisis on our southern border. Most lawmakers think it's too much money and not enough funds earmarked for border security.

Washington Times:

Even Texas Gov. Rick Perry, personally recruited by the president to persuade Republicans to support the measure, threw cold water on the idea. He said the president doesn’t need that much money and instead should send National Guard troops to secure the border.

The apparent defeat caps a whirlwind several days for the White House, which responded to increasing calls for action — and criticism of Mr. Obama for his decision not to visit the border while fundraising in Texas last week — by seeking more spending.

Republican leaders such as Mr. Perry also have put the request into a larger context, noting that Mr. Obama allowed the problem to worsen over the past five years, then responded to public pressure by demanding that Congress pass his supplemental spending plan immediately.

“It is a very large amount of money, and as you analyze it, very little of it is for border security. And I think until he gets realistic about the problem and how you deal with the problem — and it is a border security issue. And we’ve got a track record now of five-plus years of him disregarding what’s going on on the border,” Mr. Perry said on “Fox News Sunday.”

“So here’s his opportunity to truly lead. Don’t blame this on anyone. Be a leader. Lay out a plan. And I will suggest to you, actually, the president doesn’t have to have this big amount of money,” the Texan said.

After meeting with Mr. Perry last week, the president personally pitched the $3.7 billion plan during a hastily arranged press conference in Dallas.

The money would be used for detaining and deporting illegal immigrant families, transporting unaccompanied children back to their home countries, greater law enforcement, housing services for children, the hiring of more immigration judges and other purposes.

In his plea, Mr. Obama suggested that the only reason for Republican opposition would be politics.

“Are folks more interested in politics or are they more interested in solving the problem? If they’re interested in solving the problem, then this can be solved. If the preference is for politics, then it won’t be solved,” he said. “This is just a very narrow issue, the supplemental, in terms of dealing with the particular problem we have right now.”

Only the most determined open borders advocate knows that this is a problem with border security. It's a no brainer in that respect and the president isn't fooling anyone by accusing Republicans of "playing politics" when his funding measure fails the most rudimentary test of safeguarding the border.
 
Specifically, why do we need funds to return these kids to their homes when the chances that they will show up for a deportation hearing are slim to none? We are releasing these children all over the country and the thought that anyone will be able to keep track of them is absurd.
 
Funds may be needed to care for these kids until we can change the law and deport them, but as it has been pointed out elsewhere, we could spend a fraction of the $3.8 billion to fly them home now.
 
Republicans should offer their own alternative that would fund border protection and change the law so we can quickly deport these kids as fast as they come in. That would "solve" the problem quicker than spending funds to disperse them throughout the country.

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