Walmart hands NY Times' editors their own posteriors

I have never met David Tovar, Walmart’s vice president, corporate communications, but I’d like to shake his hand. In this brilliant response to a column by Timothy Egan of the New York Times, Mr. Tovar puts to shame the editors who worked on the Egan piece, literally taking a red pencil to the piece they deigned to publish, and showing them how to do their jobs.

For example:

As you can suss from this excerpt, the premise of the Egan column is that Starbucks (which dispenses expensive coffee to the type of people who work at the New York Times) is a good company, while Walmart (which offers low prices and improves the standard of living of the lower half of the income distribution) is baaaad. The obvious class bias here is something Mr. Tovar is far too polite to mention, but it is what sticks in my craw even more than the sloppiness with facts that makes the Egan column disgraceful.

The left in the United States, of which the Times is the leading media spokesman, needs villains in order to sell its political program, which, on its own, is unappealing. Witness the Obama re-election campaign, which relied on demonizing Mitt Romney as having magically caused a worker at a company his firm invested in to get cancer. Saul Alinsky, who dedicated his seminal work to Lucifer, taught them to isolate their targets, and they have learned well.

Walmart’s greatest sin is its nonunion workforce, of course. But the flexibility and economy that brings the company has enabled it to actually improve the standard of living of its customers, who tend to be of lower income than the liberal elites that disdain the company. While comforting themselves that they argue for the interests of the less advantaged members of society, the New York Times, the unions, and the liberal elites that attack Walmart are trying to raise the costs of the essentials purchased at Walmart by people with little or no margin of discretionary income. These are people who love the working class and welfare recipients in the abstract, but laugh at them in private for their obesity (see: People of Walmart) and failure to understand their “objective” class interests (see: What’s the Matter with Kansas).

The beauty of Mr. Tovar’s effort is that it adopts the methods of editors and turns it against them. It hits them square in their egos, which is where they spend most of their conscious life.

Hat tip: Powerline

I have never met David Tovar, Walmart’s vice president, corporate communications, but I’d like to shake his hand. In this brilliant response to a column by Timothy Egan of the New York Times, Mr. Tovar puts to shame the editors who worked on the Egan piece, literally taking a red pencil to the piece they deigned to publish, and showing them how to do their jobs.

For example:

As you can suss from this excerpt, the premise of the Egan column is that Starbucks (which dispenses expensive coffee to the type of people who work at the New York Times) is a good company, while Walmart (which offers low prices and improves the standard of living of the lower half of the income distribution) is baaaad. The obvious class bias here is something Mr. Tovar is far too polite to mention, but it is what sticks in my craw even more than the sloppiness with facts that makes the Egan column disgraceful.

The left in the United States, of which the Times is the leading media spokesman, needs villains in order to sell its political program, which, on its own, is unappealing. Witness the Obama re-election campaign, which relied on demonizing Mitt Romney as having magically caused a worker at a company his firm invested in to get cancer. Saul Alinsky, who dedicated his seminal work to Lucifer, taught them to isolate their targets, and they have learned well.

Walmart’s greatest sin is its nonunion workforce, of course. But the flexibility and economy that brings the company has enabled it to actually improve the standard of living of its customers, who tend to be of lower income than the liberal elites that disdain the company. While comforting themselves that they argue for the interests of the less advantaged members of society, the New York Times, the unions, and the liberal elites that attack Walmart are trying to raise the costs of the essentials purchased at Walmart by people with little or no margin of discretionary income. These are people who love the working class and welfare recipients in the abstract, but laugh at them in private for their obesity (see: People of Walmart) and failure to understand their “objective” class interests (see: What’s the Matter with Kansas).

The beauty of Mr. Tovar’s effort is that it adopts the methods of editors and turns it against them. It hits them square in their egos, which is where they spend most of their conscious life.

Hat tip: Powerline

RECENT VIDEOS