US troops in Bahrain told to observe Ramadan customs

Sharia law applies equally to Muslims and infidels, and the United States Military is taking note and complying in Islamic Bahrain.  As Ramadan begins, US forces are being instructed to follow prohibitions of Sharia. Hedrick Simoes writes in Stars and Stripes:

U.S. personnel accustomed to drinking their coffee on the drive to work will have to put that habit on hold for about a month. It’s one of a few lifestyle changes Americans will have to make during the holy month of Ramadan.

Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar. Officials expect Ramadan to begin at sunrise on Saturday, depending on when the new moon is sighted. The holy month lasts for approximately 30 days — until about July 28. For Muslims around the world, Ramadan is a month of fasting and devotion to God. Most Muslims fast from dawn to sunset, when families gather for Iftar — the meal that breaks the fast.

For the 8,200 U.S. personnel living here, and those serving throughout the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility — including servicemembers, civilian personnel, contractors and family members — the month may require changing some daily routines.

Oddly enough, in Catholic countries nonbelievers are exempt from Canon law. In the Jewish state Israel, gentiles may eat pork, work on the Sabbath, and otherwise disregard scriptural injunctions. But Islam is supremacist and insists that infidels bow down to its strictures.

A “cultural adviser” to the Bahrain base goes so far as to have:

encouraged personnel to experience Iftar in a Ramadan tent, many of which are set up at various locations around Bahrain during the holy month and welcome non-Muslims.

“Make it a point to visit these tents while you’re here. You don’t know if you’ll ever come back to Bahrain in the future,” Hassan said during the brief.

Isn’t it time that we started asking for a little reciprocity from Muslims in this country? If we have to follow their customs in their countries, maybe the hijab is inappropriate here.

Hat tip: Pamela Geller

Sharia law applies equally to Muslims and infidels, and the United States Military is taking note and complying in Islamic Bahrain.  As Ramadan begins, US forces are being instructed to follow prohibitions of Sharia. Hedrick Simoes writes in Stars and Stripes:

U.S. personnel accustomed to drinking their coffee on the drive to work will have to put that habit on hold for about a month. It’s one of a few lifestyle changes Americans will have to make during the holy month of Ramadan.

Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar. Officials expect Ramadan to begin at sunrise on Saturday, depending on when the new moon is sighted. The holy month lasts for approximately 30 days — until about July 28. For Muslims around the world, Ramadan is a month of fasting and devotion to God. Most Muslims fast from dawn to sunset, when families gather for Iftar — the meal that breaks the fast.

For the 8,200 U.S. personnel living here, and those serving throughout the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility — including servicemembers, civilian personnel, contractors and family members — the month may require changing some daily routines.

Oddly enough, in Catholic countries nonbelievers are exempt from Canon law. In the Jewish state Israel, gentiles may eat pork, work on the Sabbath, and otherwise disregard scriptural injunctions. But Islam is supremacist and insists that infidels bow down to its strictures.

A “cultural adviser” to the Bahrain base goes so far as to have:

encouraged personnel to experience Iftar in a Ramadan tent, many of which are set up at various locations around Bahrain during the holy month and welcome non-Muslims.

“Make it a point to visit these tents while you’re here. You don’t know if you’ll ever come back to Bahrain in the future,” Hassan said during the brief.

Isn’t it time that we started asking for a little reciprocity from Muslims in this country? If we have to follow their customs in their countries, maybe the hijab is inappropriate here.

Hat tip: Pamela Geller