IT professionals' trade association not buying IRS story on Lerner emails

The IRS is peddling an unlikely tale on the alleged destruction of Lois Lerner’s emails. The International Association of Information Technology Asset Managers (IAITAM), a trade association that administers internationally accepted certifications for information technology professionals has gone on the record that matters were not handled properly. Jim Swift reports in the Weekly Standard:

According to the group’s standards, if Lerner’s supposedly malfunctioning hardware was properly destroyed, there would be records of it. 

Dr. Barbara Rembiesa, president of IAITAM, questions whether there is documentation of the destruction of the files. Who performed the work, says Rembiesa, is important because not all IT professionals are IAITAM certified. 

 “The notion that these emails just magically vanished makes no sense whatsoever.  That is not how IT asset management at major businesses and government institutions works in this country.  When the hard drive in question was destroyed, the IRS should have called in an accredited IT Asset Destruction (ITAD) professional or firm to complete that process, which requires extensive documentation, official signoffs, approvals, and signatures of completion.  If this was done, there would be records.  If this was not done, this is the smoking gun that proves the drive or drives were destroyed improperly – or not at all.”

It is important to note again that official records are required by law to be properly maintained.  John Koskinen has testified under oath that the IRS tried to reconstruct the records but failed. There should be subpoenas for all the official records of thise attempts.

The IRS is peddling an unlikely tale on the alleged destruction of Lois Lerner’s emails. The International Association of Information Technology Asset Managers (IAITAM), a trade association that administers internationally accepted certifications for information technology professionals has gone on the record that matters were not handled properly. Jim Swift reports in the Weekly Standard:

According to the group’s standards, if Lerner’s supposedly malfunctioning hardware was properly destroyed, there would be records of it. 

Dr. Barbara Rembiesa, president of IAITAM, questions whether there is documentation of the destruction of the files. Who performed the work, says Rembiesa, is important because not all IT professionals are IAITAM certified. 

 “The notion that these emails just magically vanished makes no sense whatsoever.  That is not how IT asset management at major businesses and government institutions works in this country.  When the hard drive in question was destroyed, the IRS should have called in an accredited IT Asset Destruction (ITAD) professional or firm to complete that process, which requires extensive documentation, official signoffs, approvals, and signatures of completion.  If this was done, there would be records.  If this was not done, this is the smoking gun that proves the drive or drives were destroyed improperly – or not at all.”

It is important to note again that official records are required by law to be properly maintained.  John Koskinen has testified under oath that the IRS tried to reconstruct the records but failed. There should be subpoenas for all the official records of thise attempts.