Gallup: George W. Bush favorability 6 points higher than Obama

Given that Barack Obama and the Democrats waged his first presidential campaign on the premise that George W. Bush was the worst president ever, and that Hope and Change were just the ticket, the latest Gallup Poll results must be disheartening:

Gallup goes out of its way to soften the blow:

Americans typically rate presidents more positively after they leave office, so Obama's relatively worse standing than his predecessors is not surprising. However, the current poll represents Obama's worst favorable rating to date.

And it explains away Carter’s dismal showing:

Though Carter left office with similarly poor job approval ratings, his lower favorable ratings today are mostly attributable to one in six Americans not having an opinion of him. That includes 36% of those younger than 30, all of whom were born after Carter left office in 1981. The only other time Gallup measured opinions of Carter with this question format, in 2007, 69% rated him favorably, 27% unfavorably, and 4% had no opinion.

Gallup also allows for the possibility that George W. Bush may rise further in public esteem:

The younger Bush's current favorable rating is likely lower than other former presidents' ratings because his term, marked by job approval ratings well below 40% during his final two years in office, is the freshest in Americans' minds.

That’s a lot of gymnastics to explain away that Carter and Obama get worse as people reckon the consequences of their presidencies. Bill Clinton, the lovable scoundrel, still enjoys public esteem, despite his record as a sexual predator.

Given that Barack Obama and the Democrats waged his first presidential campaign on the premise that George W. Bush was the worst president ever, and that Hope and Change were just the ticket, the latest Gallup Poll results must be disheartening:

Gallup goes out of its way to soften the blow:

Americans typically rate presidents more positively after they leave office, so Obama's relatively worse standing than his predecessors is not surprising. However, the current poll represents Obama's worst favorable rating to date.

And it explains away Carter’s dismal showing:

Though Carter left office with similarly poor job approval ratings, his lower favorable ratings today are mostly attributable to one in six Americans not having an opinion of him. That includes 36% of those younger than 30, all of whom were born after Carter left office in 1981. The only other time Gallup measured opinions of Carter with this question format, in 2007, 69% rated him favorably, 27% unfavorably, and 4% had no opinion.

Gallup also allows for the possibility that George W. Bush may rise further in public esteem:

The younger Bush's current favorable rating is likely lower than other former presidents' ratings because his term, marked by job approval ratings well below 40% during his final two years in office, is the freshest in Americans' minds.

That’s a lot of gymnastics to explain away that Carter and Obama get worse as people reckon the consequences of their presidencies. Bill Clinton, the lovable scoundrel, still enjoys public esteem, despite his record as a sexual predator.

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