Report: US threatened Nigeria with sanctions in 2013 for fighting Boko Haram

According to a Nigerian website, in 2013 the United States threatened Nigeria with suspension of military assistance following suppression of Boko Haram after an attack by the Muslim jihadist group on a military outpost outside the city of Baga.  US Ambassador to Nigeria, Terrence P. McCulley reportedly called a meeting with Soros-funded Human Rights Watch and other members of the “human rights community in Nigeria.”  

THEWILL gathered from a source at the meeting who opted to remain anonymous that the Ambassador called the meeting to feel the pulse of the human rights community over the violations of basic rights of citizens by security forces under the Goodluck Jonathan administration.

As the meeting progressed, Mr. Terrence announced to the activists that the US congress had previously passed a law that bars the United States from rendering military assistance to any government that violates basic rights of citizens. He said the Obama led US government has therefore ceased to assist Nigeria militarily in obedience to the law.

The source said Mr. Terence listened as his visitors expressed frustrations with the Nigerian government over its inability to bring to justice security operatives that have violated rights of fellow citizens.

Oddly enough, nowhere in this report is there any mention of concern for the victims of Boko Haram.

Writing in Canada Free Press, Fred Dardick comments:

The threat of military sanctions, and whether or not they were actually implemented, is an open question as there has been zero coverage of this issue in the mainstream media, may have had a chilling effect on Nigerian military operations against Boko Haram. Since Ambassador McCulley’s proclamation the Nigerian civilian death toll by Boko Haram Islamic militants has skyrocketed over the past year.

No wonder the Nigerian government was initially reluctant to accept U.S. assistance with finding the more than 200 Christian girls kidnapped by Boko Haram last month. Emboldening Nigeria’s Islamic terrorist enemies and having been already accused by the Obama administration of crimes against humanity for fighting militants who were responsible for hundreds of civilian deaths since 2010, they likely felt that Obama’s belated support was more a product of diplomatic CYA than actually caring about the fate of kidnapped Nigerian children.

The Obama administration’s attitudes toward Boko Haram have been disturbing. It appears that for whatever reasons, these jihadists were not regarded as a problem.

According to a Nigerian website, in 2013 the United States threatened Nigeria with suspension of military assistance following suppression of Boko Haram after an attack by the Muslim jihadist group on a military outpost outside the city of Baga.  US Ambassador to Nigeria, Terrence P. McCulley reportedly called a meeting with Soros-funded Human Rights Watch and other members of the “human rights community in Nigeria.”  

THEWILL gathered from a source at the meeting who opted to remain anonymous that the Ambassador called the meeting to feel the pulse of the human rights community over the violations of basic rights of citizens by security forces under the Goodluck Jonathan administration.

As the meeting progressed, Mr. Terrence announced to the activists that the US congress had previously passed a law that bars the United States from rendering military assistance to any government that violates basic rights of citizens. He said the Obama led US government has therefore ceased to assist Nigeria militarily in obedience to the law.

The source said Mr. Terence listened as his visitors expressed frustrations with the Nigerian government over its inability to bring to justice security operatives that have violated rights of fellow citizens.

Oddly enough, nowhere in this report is there any mention of concern for the victims of Boko Haram.

Writing in Canada Free Press, Fred Dardick comments:

The threat of military sanctions, and whether or not they were actually implemented, is an open question as there has been zero coverage of this issue in the mainstream media, may have had a chilling effect on Nigerian military operations against Boko Haram. Since Ambassador McCulley’s proclamation the Nigerian civilian death toll by Boko Haram Islamic militants has skyrocketed over the past year.

No wonder the Nigerian government was initially reluctant to accept U.S. assistance with finding the more than 200 Christian girls kidnapped by Boko Haram last month. Emboldening Nigeria’s Islamic terrorist enemies and having been already accused by the Obama administration of crimes against humanity for fighting militants who were responsible for hundreds of civilian deaths since 2010, they likely felt that Obama’s belated support was more a product of diplomatic CYA than actually caring about the fate of kidnapped Nigerian children.

The Obama administration’s attitudes toward Boko Haram have been disturbing. It appears that for whatever reasons, these jihadists were not regarded as a problem.

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