Mitt Romney Wins -- in Ukraine

Arnold Cusmariu
A runoff was avoided in Ukraine’s presidential election Sunday when Petro Poroshenko won with about 56% of the vote. Mr. Poroshenko succeeds the country's pro-Russia leader, Viktor Yanukovich, ousted last February. A strong voter turnout was reported around the capital city of Kiev. Vladimir Putin has promised to respect election results.

Mr. Poroshenko brings impressive credentials to his new office. He has served as Secretary of the National Security and Defense Council, Minister for Foreign Affairs, Minister of Trade and Economic Development, and head of the Council of Ukraine's National Bank. He is a billionaire, having made his fortune in the chocolate industry.

Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., who was in Ukraine monitoring the vote, reportedly told “Fox News Sunday” that the 48-year-old Poroshenko is considered somebody who can work with the East and the West and that he wants more U.S. military support.

It is worth noting that an inexperienced community organizer with a glib tongue in his head was not one of Mr. Poroshenko’s opponents. Indeed, that would have been an anomaly in Ukrainian politics. Gone are the days of Soviet rule when rabble rousing on behalf of the Party and a “humble” lineage were sufficient credentials to getting ahead. The people of Ukraine now expect competence. It looks like they will get it.

Rumor has it – and it is only a rumor – that New York’s former mayor, Michael Bloomberg is unhappy with the election of a man who got rich selling a fattening product like chocolate. Another rumor – again, only a rumor – is that New York City’s fitness police will organize a demonstration when Mr. Poroshenko comes to the U.N.

A runoff was avoided in Ukraine’s presidential election Sunday when Petro Poroshenko won with about 56% of the vote. Mr. Poroshenko succeeds the country's pro-Russia leader, Viktor Yanukovich, ousted last February. A strong voter turnout was reported around the capital city of Kiev. Vladimir Putin has promised to respect election results.

Mr. Poroshenko brings impressive credentials to his new office. He has served as Secretary of the National Security and Defense Council, Minister for Foreign Affairs, Minister of Trade and Economic Development, and head of the Council of Ukraine's National Bank. He is a billionaire, having made his fortune in the chocolate industry.

Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., who was in Ukraine monitoring the vote, reportedly told “Fox News Sunday” that the 48-year-old Poroshenko is considered somebody who can work with the East and the West and that he wants more U.S. military support.

It is worth noting that an inexperienced community organizer with a glib tongue in his head was not one of Mr. Poroshenko’s opponents. Indeed, that would have been an anomaly in Ukrainian politics. Gone are the days of Soviet rule when rabble rousing on behalf of the Party and a “humble” lineage were sufficient credentials to getting ahead. The people of Ukraine now expect competence. It looks like they will get it.

Rumor has it – and it is only a rumor – that New York’s former mayor, Michael Bloomberg is unhappy with the election of a man who got rich selling a fattening product like chocolate. Another rumor – again, only a rumor – is that New York City’s fitness police will organize a demonstration when Mr. Poroshenko comes to the U.N.