2013 Was Not the Fourth-Hottest Year for the United States

Sierra Rayne
In the battle-space over accurate climate reporting, the climate alarmists are continuing to spread incorrect information.  For example, over at the New Republic, Rebecca Leber is reporting on the latest National Climate Assessment, and she makes the following claim:

2013 was tied for the fourth-hottest year for the United States.

Wrong.

According to the NOAA database, 2013 was only the 37th-hottest year on record for the United States, coming in at 52.42°F, just 0.4°F above the 20th-century average.

In the same section of her article, Leber states, "Imagine the hottest days that the country experienced over the last two decades. Now imagine them 10 to 15 degrees hotter. Climate change means the deadly summer heat waves will only grow worse."

So now climate change means that the hottest days of the year across the United States will get even hotter by "10 to 15 degrees"?  That sounds truly apocalyptic.

Here are the trends in the hottest day of the year for the most populous cities in the United States since 1980.  Of the 72 regions, 63 exhibit no increasing trend, only 7 have an increasing trend, and two are declining.

This cannot bode well for the climate alarmists.

July is the warmest month in the United States.  There has been no significant trend in average July temperatures since at least 1920.  Here is a plot of five-year running average July temperatures in the continental US since 1920.  Note the 1990s: coldest five-year average July temperatures in the past century!

And we're supposed to get hysterical about this?

In the battle-space over accurate climate reporting, the climate alarmists are continuing to spread incorrect information.  For example, over at the New Republic, Rebecca Leber is reporting on the latest National Climate Assessment, and she makes the following claim:

2013 was tied for the fourth-hottest year for the United States.

Wrong.

According to the NOAA database, 2013 was only the 37th-hottest year on record for the United States, coming in at 52.42°F, just 0.4°F above the 20th-century average.

In the same section of her article, Leber states, "Imagine the hottest days that the country experienced over the last two decades. Now imagine them 10 to 15 degrees hotter. Climate change means the deadly summer heat waves will only grow worse."

So now climate change means that the hottest days of the year across the United States will get even hotter by "10 to 15 degrees"?  That sounds truly apocalyptic.

Here are the trends in the hottest day of the year for the most populous cities in the United States since 1980.  Of the 72 regions, 63 exhibit no increasing trend, only 7 have an increasing trend, and two are declining.

This cannot bode well for the climate alarmists.

July is the warmest month in the United States.  There has been no significant trend in average July temperatures since at least 1920.  Here is a plot of five-year running average July temperatures in the continental US since 1920.  Note the 1990s: coldest five-year average July temperatures in the past century!

And we're supposed to get hysterical about this?