Randi Rhodes leaving talk radio, blasts Al Franken and Rachel Maddow

Thomas Lifson
The bones of failed liberal talk radio network Air America were rattled this week as Randi Rhodes, one of its stars (such as they were) announced the end of her talk radio show. Inadvertently, she indicted progressives on two separate grounds. Currently heard on but 35 stations, and syndicated by Premier Networks,  Rhodes used the opportunity to settle scores with her former colleagues at Air America. Jack Coleman of Newsbusters has the story:

Rhodes spent considerable time on her show this week saying goodbye to listeners and outlining the rationale for her decision. She also couldn't resist taking swipes at Al Franken and Rachel Maddow, her former colleagues at now-defunct Air America Radio, especially Maddow (audio) --

So when Air America came I said, oh my God, and the opportunity is amazing, to be the advocate of even more people and to tell people even more about, you know, how you get through this life and what's important, you know, that you vote and participation and your own life, meaning every part of it is the most important thing that you can choose. So I took that and I've always described that as the worst of times and the best of times because it was the best of times for me in that I had this platform that I never would have had without them, and it was the worst of times because frankly that place was run like, OK, into the ground. How's that? That's how it was run and it was apparent from the day we got there.

And so it was like, oh my God, this is the greatest opportunity with the worst, wrong, most insane company, which passed through hands and different hands and these hands and that and people were using it for their own reasons. People were using it not to advocate for others but people were using it for their own advancement, to get someplace else. No one was there to make that place work. Everyone that was there, and they kept saying, she's the only radio person, and there was a reason why I wasn't in it for myself. I was in it for the format. I was in it for being an advocate, for having a platform where things like what I say could be heard and become very mainstream and understandable and interesting and funny and, you know, it could be a platform like we've never had before. But other people were not there for that. Some people saw, you know, a chance to be in a Cabinet and other people saw it as a chance to go to the Senate and other people saw it as a chance to national television. Everybody was using it for their own reasonand it just, it was not, so I came back here to Florida.

The most interesting parts of this, aside from the remarkable lack of graciousness on Rhodes part,  are:

  1. The admission that ambition is what drives two of the heroes of the left, Franken and Maddow. They are users, in Rhodes career deathbed statement.
  2. The degree of envy visible in Rhodes’ words. Envy is, after all, the driving force behind the left.

Hat tip: iOwnTheWorld.com

The bones of failed liberal talk radio network Air America were rattled this week as Randi Rhodes, one of its stars (such as they were) announced the end of her talk radio show. Inadvertently, she indicted progressives on two separate grounds. Currently heard on but 35 stations, and syndicated by Premier Networks,  Rhodes used the opportunity to settle scores with her former colleagues at Air America. Jack Coleman of Newsbusters has the story:

Rhodes spent considerable time on her show this week saying goodbye to listeners and outlining the rationale for her decision. She also couldn't resist taking swipes at Al Franken and Rachel Maddow, her former colleagues at now-defunct Air America Radio, especially Maddow (audio) --

So when Air America came I said, oh my God, and the opportunity is amazing, to be the advocate of even more people and to tell people even more about, you know, how you get through this life and what's important, you know, that you vote and participation and your own life, meaning every part of it is the most important thing that you can choose. So I took that and I've always described that as the worst of times and the best of times because it was the best of times for me in that I had this platform that I never would have had without them, and it was the worst of times because frankly that place was run like, OK, into the ground. How's that? That's how it was run and it was apparent from the day we got there.

And so it was like, oh my God, this is the greatest opportunity with the worst, wrong, most insane company, which passed through hands and different hands and these hands and that and people were using it for their own reasons. People were using it not to advocate for others but people were using it for their own advancement, to get someplace else. No one was there to make that place work. Everyone that was there, and they kept saying, she's the only radio person, and there was a reason why I wasn't in it for myself. I was in it for the format. I was in it for being an advocate, for having a platform where things like what I say could be heard and become very mainstream and understandable and interesting and funny and, you know, it could be a platform like we've never had before. But other people were not there for that. Some people saw, you know, a chance to be in a Cabinet and other people saw it as a chance to go to the Senate and other people saw it as a chance to national television. Everybody was using it for their own reasonand it just, it was not, so I came back here to Florida.

The most interesting parts of this, aside from the remarkable lack of graciousness on Rhodes part,  are:

  1. The admission that ambition is what drives two of the heroes of the left, Franken and Maddow. They are users, in Rhodes career deathbed statement.
  2. The degree of envy visible in Rhodes’ words. Envy is, after all, the driving force behind the left.

Hat tip: iOwnTheWorld.com