Elizabeth Warren could face a nightmare on her book tour

Thomas Lifson
I can feel the schadenfreude welling inside me as I read that a group of Cherokee women are preparing to confront Elizabeth Warren as she sets forth on a national book tour to publicize her new book.  Sen. Warren matters a lot more than most freshman senators because she must be considered a near-frontrunner for the Democratic 2016 nomination if Hillary Clinton decides that playing with her forthcoming grandchild is better way to occupy her time than going through the meat grinder as a candidate.

William Jacobson of Legal Insurrection, Warren’s principal nemesis in the blogosphere, has the details of what awaits Fauxcahontas:

In Elizabeth Warren’s new book, A Fighting Chance, Warren claims to be “hurt and angry” that people criticized her claim to be Native American, specifically Cherokee.  Warren blamed the Scott Brown campaign, the local Republican Party, and “some blogger.”

In fact, Warren has no one to blame but herself for her false claim to be Cherokee.  ReadElizabeth Warren Wiki, and these posts responding to the claims in her book:

Warren will be launching a nationwide book tour.  Someone who wants to meet Warren is Twila Barnes.

Barnes is the Cherokee Genealogist whose groundbreaking genealogical research exposed the falsehood to Warren’s claims.  Barnes and her team of Cherokee genealogists traced Warren’s family lines back to the early 1800s and documented that Warren’s family not only was not Cherokee or other Native American, but also that they never lived as such:

Barnes also debunked much of the “family lore” used by Warren to justify claiming Native American status.  One of my favorites was Barnes’ discovery that Warren’s maternal great grandfather, on the supposedly Cherokee bloodline, was featured in the local newspaper in 1906 as being white and having shot an Indian. And also Barnes’ discovery that Warren’s parents’ wedding was joyously announced in the local newspaper, which would contradict Warren’s claim that her parents had to elope because her father’s family would not tolerate their son marrying an Indian.

Warren has so far been able to duck facing her Cherokee critics. A book tour makes that much, much more difficult.

If Hillary decides to be a grandma and Warren goes for the nomination, we are in for a lot of fun.

I can feel the schadenfreude welling inside me as I read that a group of Cherokee women are preparing to confront Elizabeth Warren as she sets forth on a national book tour to publicize her new book.  Sen. Warren matters a lot more than most freshman senators because she must be considered a near-frontrunner for the Democratic 2016 nomination if Hillary Clinton decides that playing with her forthcoming grandchild is better way to occupy her time than going through the meat grinder as a candidate.

William Jacobson of Legal Insurrection, Warren’s principal nemesis in the blogosphere, has the details of what awaits Fauxcahontas:

In Elizabeth Warren’s new book, A Fighting Chance, Warren claims to be “hurt and angry” that people criticized her claim to be Native American, specifically Cherokee.  Warren blamed the Scott Brown campaign, the local Republican Party, and “some blogger.”

In fact, Warren has no one to blame but herself for her false claim to be Cherokee.  ReadElizabeth Warren Wiki, and these posts responding to the claims in her book:

Warren will be launching a nationwide book tour.  Someone who wants to meet Warren is Twila Barnes.

Barnes is the Cherokee Genealogist whose groundbreaking genealogical research exposed the falsehood to Warren’s claims.  Barnes and her team of Cherokee genealogists traced Warren’s family lines back to the early 1800s and documented that Warren’s family not only was not Cherokee or other Native American, but also that they never lived as such:

Barnes also debunked much of the “family lore” used by Warren to justify claiming Native American status.  One of my favorites was Barnes’ discovery that Warren’s maternal great grandfather, on the supposedly Cherokee bloodline, was featured in the local newspaper in 1906 as being white and having shot an Indian. And also Barnes’ discovery that Warren’s parents’ wedding was joyously announced in the local newspaper, which would contradict Warren’s claim that her parents had to elope because her father’s family would not tolerate their son marrying an Indian.

Warren has so far been able to duck facing her Cherokee critics. A book tour makes that much, much more difficult.

If Hillary decides to be a grandma and Warren goes for the nomination, we are in for a lot of fun.