When US Ambassador to UN Speaks, It's Just Air

The best US Ambassador to the UN Samantha Power could do in her March 14 speech on Russia’s veto of the UN resolution--declaring their referendum on Crimea’s future illegal--is some verbal foot-stomping signifying nothing.

Russian Federation members probably had to stifle chuckles when they heard what amounts to Power’s stab at poetry while trying to sound tough. The UN representative went so far as to give the Russians a history lesson on their own past.

Power joins Obama, Kerry and Rice at the bottom of the barrel for this delusional jibber jabber so characteristic of utopian progressives when it comes to foreign policy.

From usun.state.gov:

We have heard, for example, about the pleas of the brave democrats of Hungary in 1956 and about the dark chill that dashed the dreams of Czechs in 1968.

We still have the time and the collective power to ensure that the past doesn’t become prologue. But history has lessons for those of us who are willing to listen. Unfortunately, not everyone was willing to listen today.

Under the UN Charter, the Russian Federation has the power to veto a Security Council resolution, but it does not have the power to veto the truth. As we know, the word “truth”, or “pravda” has a prominent place in the story of modern Russia. From the days of Lenin and Trotsky until the fall of the Berlin Wall, Pravda was the name of the house newspaper of the Soviet Communist regime. But throughout that period, one could search in vain to find pravda in Pravda. And today, one again searches in vain, to find truth in the Russian position on Crimea, on Ukraine, or on the proposed Security Council resolution considered and vetoed a few moments ago.

Two days ago, in this very chamber, Ukraine’s prime minister appealed to Russia to embrace peace. Instead, Russia has rejected a resolution that had peace at its heart and law flowing through its veins.

Crimea is part of Ukraine today; it will be part of Ukraine tomorrow; it will be part of Ukraine next week; it will be part of Ukraine unless and until its status is changed in accordance with Ukrainian and international law.

Power can run her mouth all she wants, but Crimea’s pro-Moscow leader Sergey Aksyonov took to Twitter with another lesson for her to add to her meaningless chatter: “Today we took a very important decision that will go down in history.” On Sunday 95% of voters in Ukraine’s Crimea supported union with Russia. 

The best US Ambassador to the UN Samantha Power could do in her March 14 speech on Russia’s veto of the UN resolution--declaring their referendum on Crimea’s future illegal--is some verbal foot-stomping signifying nothing.

Russian Federation members probably had to stifle chuckles when they heard what amounts to Power’s stab at poetry while trying to sound tough. The UN representative went so far as to give the Russians a history lesson on their own past.

Power joins Obama, Kerry and Rice at the bottom of the barrel for this delusional jibber jabber so characteristic of utopian progressives when it comes to foreign policy.

From usun.state.gov:

We have heard, for example, about the pleas of the brave democrats of Hungary in 1956 and about the dark chill that dashed the dreams of Czechs in 1968.

We still have the time and the collective power to ensure that the past doesn’t become prologue. But history has lessons for those of us who are willing to listen. Unfortunately, not everyone was willing to listen today.

Under the UN Charter, the Russian Federation has the power to veto a Security Council resolution, but it does not have the power to veto the truth. As we know, the word “truth”, or “pravda” has a prominent place in the story of modern Russia. From the days of Lenin and Trotsky until the fall of the Berlin Wall, Pravda was the name of the house newspaper of the Soviet Communist regime. But throughout that period, one could search in vain to find pravda in Pravda. And today, one again searches in vain, to find truth in the Russian position on Crimea, on Ukraine, or on the proposed Security Council resolution considered and vetoed a few moments ago.

Two days ago, in this very chamber, Ukraine’s prime minister appealed to Russia to embrace peace. Instead, Russia has rejected a resolution that had peace at its heart and law flowing through its veins.

Crimea is part of Ukraine today; it will be part of Ukraine tomorrow; it will be part of Ukraine next week; it will be part of Ukraine unless and until its status is changed in accordance with Ukrainian and international law.

Power can run her mouth all she wants, but Crimea’s pro-Moscow leader Sergey Aksyonov took to Twitter with another lesson for her to add to her meaningless chatter: “Today we took a very important decision that will go down in history.” On Sunday 95% of voters in Ukraine’s Crimea supported union with Russia. 

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