Race bullies are losing the voter ID battle

Thomas Lifson
Using the cry of “racism,” those who see benefit in voter fraud have been attempting to bully courts and legislatures into forsaking reasonable voter identification requirements. But the rhetoric has reached and passed its limits of effectiveness. Rasmussen reports:

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 78% of Likely U.S. Voters believe everyone should be required to prove his or her citizenship before being allowed to register to vote. That’s up from 71% a year ago. Just 19% oppose that requirement. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

Twenty-nine percent (29%) believe laws that require proof of citizenship before allowing voter registration discriminate against such voters. But more than twice as many (61%) say such laws do not discriminate, up three points from 58% who felt that way in March of last year. Ten percent (10%) are undecided.

Now is the time to press forward with state-level initiatives. If an when the GOP achieves Congressional majorities and an Oval Office occupant, a national voter identification requirement ought to be instituted. The volume and intensity of Democrats’ rhetoric suggests they realize they have been benefiting extensively from fraud.

Using the cry of “racism,” those who see benefit in voter fraud have been attempting to bully courts and legislatures into forsaking reasonable voter identification requirements. But the rhetoric has reached and passed its limits of effectiveness. Rasmussen reports:

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 78% of Likely U.S. Voters believe everyone should be required to prove his or her citizenship before being allowed to register to vote. That’s up from 71% a year ago. Just 19% oppose that requirement. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

Twenty-nine percent (29%) believe laws that require proof of citizenship before allowing voter registration discriminate against such voters. But more than twice as many (61%) say such laws do not discriminate, up three points from 58% who felt that way in March of last year. Ten percent (10%) are undecided.

Now is the time to press forward with state-level initiatives. If an when the GOP achieves Congressional majorities and an Oval Office occupant, a national voter identification requirement ought to be instituted. The volume and intensity of Democrats’ rhetoric suggests they realize they have been benefiting extensively from fraud.