Obamacare marketing desperation mounts

Thomas Lifson
Has there ever been an advertising campaign this well-funded that has produced worse results and lamer content than the $700 million devoted to Obamacare?  Pajama Boy may be fading into the dim recesses of the national memory, but in his place comes the last resort of desperate marketers: cash prizes. Jonelle Marte of Market Watch reports:

With roughly two weeks left in the open enrollment period for health insurance, some groups are trying to sell Obamacare to young people in terms they might actually understand: music, comedy, and cash.

Young Invincibles , a nonprofit organization based in Washington, D.C. that is focused on the economic issues affecting young adults, launched a sweepstakes last week where it is awarding a cash prize of $1,200 — enough to potentially cover a year’s worth of health insurance premiums for a young adult — to people who download their health care app or submit a card in the mail. 

But wait: it gets worse. Obamacare is unleashing lame music, the sort of thing that makes you wish you were at a mime festival instead:

Kyle Pfister, founder of Ninjas for Health, a startup based in Milwaukee that consults for public health agencies, got local musicians talking — and singing — about the law by giving them an artistic task: write a song about the benefits of getting health insurance. After more than 10 artists gathered to sing and record a video for the song, dubbed “Sing Forward,” he engaged other local musicians by challenging them with a competition to see who could develop the best remix of the song. (snip)

Hannah Conklin, one of the winners announced Wednesday afternoon, recorded herself on Valentine’s Day singing a folk version of the song on a street corner in Asheville, N.C., where she lives now, as two people dressed in heart costumes danced alongside her.“We will sing forward, our health to yours ,” the 28-year-old belted while strumming her red guitar.

 Is this really going to attract anyone? I usually cross the street to avoid "performance artists" like this.

Has there ever been an advertising campaign this well-funded that has produced worse results and lamer content than the $700 million devoted to Obamacare?  Pajama Boy may be fading into the dim recesses of the national memory, but in his place comes the last resort of desperate marketers: cash prizes. Jonelle Marte of Market Watch reports:

With roughly two weeks left in the open enrollment period for health insurance, some groups are trying to sell Obamacare to young people in terms they might actually understand: music, comedy, and cash.

Young Invincibles , a nonprofit organization based in Washington, D.C. that is focused on the economic issues affecting young adults, launched a sweepstakes last week where it is awarding a cash prize of $1,200 — enough to potentially cover a year’s worth of health insurance premiums for a young adult — to people who download their health care app or submit a card in the mail. 

But wait: it gets worse. Obamacare is unleashing lame music, the sort of thing that makes you wish you were at a mime festival instead:

Kyle Pfister, founder of Ninjas for Health, a startup based in Milwaukee that consults for public health agencies, got local musicians talking — and singing — about the law by giving them an artistic task: write a song about the benefits of getting health insurance. After more than 10 artists gathered to sing and record a video for the song, dubbed “Sing Forward,” he engaged other local musicians by challenging them with a competition to see who could develop the best remix of the song. (snip)

Hannah Conklin, one of the winners announced Wednesday afternoon, recorded herself on Valentine’s Day singing a folk version of the song on a street corner in Asheville, N.C., where she lives now, as two people dressed in heart costumes danced alongside her.“We will sing forward, our health to yours ,” the 28-year-old belted while strumming her red guitar.

 Is this really going to attract anyone? I usually cross the street to avoid "performance artists" like this.