Ezekiel Emanuel lets the cat out of the bag on Obamacare

Thomas Lifson
Obamacare architect Ezekiel Emanuel has made two damning admissions about Obamacare, and he doesn’t even know it. Last year I wrote about Ezekiel Emanuel becoming a “favorite” of mine for his obnoxious and unpersuasive attempts to explain and support Obamacare. He is so arrogant that he presumes rationalizations that work for him will equally persuade others, because, after all, he so much more intelligent than everyone else that his logic is impeccable.

Writing in the New York Times yesterday, Zeke told Americans, in an op-ed titled “In Health Care, Choice Is Overrated,” that they really don’t need to have as much choice in their medical care as they think they do (translation: we’re smarter than you are and know what’s best for you).

More tellingly, in the friendly environment of the Alex Wagner Show on MSNBC, Zeke admitted the poltical motivations behind the individual mandate delay. The Daily Caller News Foundation reports:

“Policy-wise, it’s probably a toss-up,” he told Wagner. “I actually think what the White House is doing is to say, ‘Look, there’s a lot of unrest about it. It’s distracting. If we extend it, it really doesn’t have that big an effect.’”

“They think, ‘well, for the political gain, it’s worth it to do that,’” he explained. “And it certainly isn’t a big deal. I keep saying — you know, they seem to be very strategic at the White House — do some of these things that are good politically but really don’t affect the underlying policy — that defend the underlying policy. Like, no chance, no way are we going to roll back the individual mandate or anything like that. And so I think that’s part of the strategy.”

Wagner seemed a little stunned. “Well, I guess I gotta play devil’s advocate for a second here, Zeke,” she said, “because to be honest, it does seem, sort of, transparently political that they would do this ahead of the midterm elections when we know the White House is very concerned about Democrats holding on to their Senate seats.” She also expressed concern over Americans who would be stuck with substandard plans because of the delay.

“I agree with you, Alex,” Emanuel claimed. “I don’t like these substandard plans, I’ve been a very big critic of them. I was a critic of the initial delay. I’m not advocating this delay. I think it’s understandable, and I also think it doesn’t go to the heart of the Affordable Care Act and making sure it really impacts the American healthcare system. But you know, I agree.”

Thanks, Zeke. Keep on talking.

Hat tip: Ed Lasky

Obamacare architect Ezekiel Emanuel has made two damning admissions about Obamacare, and he doesn’t even know it. Last year I wrote about Ezekiel Emanuel becoming a “favorite” of mine for his obnoxious and unpersuasive attempts to explain and support Obamacare. He is so arrogant that he presumes rationalizations that work for him will equally persuade others, because, after all, he so much more intelligent than everyone else that his logic is impeccable.

Writing in the New York Times yesterday, Zeke told Americans, in an op-ed titled “In Health Care, Choice Is Overrated,” that they really don’t need to have as much choice in their medical care as they think they do (translation: we’re smarter than you are and know what’s best for you).

More tellingly, in the friendly environment of the Alex Wagner Show on MSNBC, Zeke admitted the poltical motivations behind the individual mandate delay. The Daily Caller News Foundation reports:

“Policy-wise, it’s probably a toss-up,” he told Wagner. “I actually think what the White House is doing is to say, ‘Look, there’s a lot of unrest about it. It’s distracting. If we extend it, it really doesn’t have that big an effect.’”

“They think, ‘well, for the political gain, it’s worth it to do that,’” he explained. “And it certainly isn’t a big deal. I keep saying — you know, they seem to be very strategic at the White House — do some of these things that are good politically but really don’t affect the underlying policy — that defend the underlying policy. Like, no chance, no way are we going to roll back the individual mandate or anything like that. And so I think that’s part of the strategy.”

Wagner seemed a little stunned. “Well, I guess I gotta play devil’s advocate for a second here, Zeke,” she said, “because to be honest, it does seem, sort of, transparently political that they would do this ahead of the midterm elections when we know the White House is very concerned about Democrats holding on to their Senate seats.” She also expressed concern over Americans who would be stuck with substandard plans because of the delay.

“I agree with you, Alex,” Emanuel claimed. “I don’t like these substandard plans, I’ve been a very big critic of them. I was a critic of the initial delay. I’m not advocating this delay. I think it’s understandable, and I also think it doesn’t go to the heart of the Affordable Care Act and making sure it really impacts the American healthcare system. But you know, I agree.”

Thanks, Zeke. Keep on talking.

Hat tip: Ed Lasky