Congressional Dems getting that sinking feeling from latest poll

It isn’t a lot of fun being a Democrat member of the House or Senate Democrat facing voters this November. Alex Sink’s defeat in Florida’s special election despite a money and name recognition advantage was bad enough, but the contents of a new Wall Street Journal-NBC News poll portend a genuine wave election sweeping out Demcorats who once enjoyed job security. Chris Cillizza of the Washington Post highlights 3 findings of great concern:

  1. 41. That's President Obama's overall job approval in the new NBC-WSJ survey, the lowest he has been in the history of the poll…. Here's why that matters. When Democrats lost control of the House in the 1994 election, President Bill Clinton's approval rating was at 46 percent in the final Gallup poll before the election. In 2010, when Republicans won 63 seats -- and the majority -- Obama was at 45 percent job approval in the last Gallup poll  (snip)
  2. 2. 44. That's the percentage of respondents who said that a "congressperson's position on national issues" would be more important in deciding their votes than the "congressperson's performance in taking care of problems in your district."… In late October 2006, 39 percent of people said a congressperson's view on national issues was more important while 39 percent said care and feeding of the district mattered more.  In October 1994, 35 percent said national issues mattered more while 51 percent prioritized local performance. So, the numbers right now point more heavily toward a nationalized election than they did in late 1994 and are close to where the environment stood in October 2006.  (snip)
  3. 33. One in three registered voters in the NBC-WSJ poll said that their vote for Congress this fall will be intended to signal opposition to President Obama. Compare that to the 24 percent who said their vote would be a way to show support for Obama and you have the enthusiasm gap between the two party bases that likely sunk (Alex) Sink on Tuesday. Again, past NBC-WSJ data is instructive. On the eve of the 2010 election, 35 percent said their vote was a way to show support for Obama while 34 percent said it was to show optimism.  
Barack Obama has gone from being the man ushering in a new era of Democrat dominance, “the one we have been waiting for,” to the albatross sinking the political careers of those who blindly followed him into the Obamacare folly.

Will some Democrats decide that before it is too late they had better turn on Obama and repudiate Obamacare? And if they do, will there be blowback from African-American constitutents who remain faithful to Obama?

I am laying a supply of popcorn. The months between now and November are going to be fun.

It isn’t a lot of fun being a Democrat member of the House or Senate Democrat facing voters this November. Alex Sink’s defeat in Florida’s special election despite a money and name recognition advantage was bad enough, but the contents of a new Wall Street Journal-NBC News poll portend a genuine wave election sweeping out Demcorats who once enjoyed job security. Chris Cillizza of the Washington Post highlights 3 findings of great concern:

  1. 41. That's President Obama's overall job approval in the new NBC-WSJ survey, the lowest he has been in the history of the poll…. Here's why that matters. When Democrats lost control of the House in the 1994 election, President Bill Clinton's approval rating was at 46 percent in the final Gallup poll before the election. In 2010, when Republicans won 63 seats -- and the majority -- Obama was at 45 percent job approval in the last Gallup poll  (snip)
  2. 2. 44. That's the percentage of respondents who said that a "congressperson's position on national issues" would be more important in deciding their votes than the "congressperson's performance in taking care of problems in your district."… In late October 2006, 39 percent of people said a congressperson's view on national issues was more important while 39 percent said care and feeding of the district mattered more.  In October 1994, 35 percent said national issues mattered more while 51 percent prioritized local performance. So, the numbers right now point more heavily toward a nationalized election than they did in late 1994 and are close to where the environment stood in October 2006.  (snip)
  3. 33. One in three registered voters in the NBC-WSJ poll said that their vote for Congress this fall will be intended to signal opposition to President Obama. Compare that to the 24 percent who said their vote would be a way to show support for Obama and you have the enthusiasm gap between the two party bases that likely sunk (Alex) Sink on Tuesday. Again, past NBC-WSJ data is instructive. On the eve of the 2010 election, 35 percent said their vote was a way to show support for Obama while 34 percent said it was to show optimism.  

Barack Obama has gone from being the man ushering in a new era of Democrat dominance, “the one we have been waiting for,” to the albatross sinking the political careers of those who blindly followed him into the Obamacare folly.

Will some Democrats decide that before it is too late they had better turn on Obama and repudiate Obamacare? And if they do, will there be blowback from African-American constitutents who remain faithful to Obama?

I am laying a supply of popcorn. The months between now and November are going to be fun.

RECENT VIDEOS