After 'bossy' is eliminated 'meritocracy' may be next on the feminist ban list

Thomas Lifson
The feminist left may be crazy, but it is powerful. Witness what happened in San Francisco at a fast-growing company that is a web-based hosting service for software development named GitHub. (hat tip: Instapundit). Via readwrite.com:

You might not immediately notice the latest change to come to GitHub unless you’re standing in its San Francisco headquarters and looking down at the floor. GitHub has removed the centerpiece of its faux Oval Office waiting room, a circular mat emblazoned with the phrase, “United Meritocracy of GitHub.”

We thought ‘meritocracy’ was a neat way to think of open source but now see the problems with it. Words matter. We’re getting a new rug.

— Chris Wanstrath (@defunkt) January 22, 2014

The purported problem with meritocracy was developed in feminist online discussion forums, and forcefully advocated by a GitHub employee:

GitHub's Julie Ann Horvath, a designer who also founded the company's all-female lecture series Passion Projects, said the rug first became a problem when photos of it made their way into feminist discussions online.

Readwrite’s Lauern Orsini attempts to explain:

In theory, a meritocracy should be a good thing. It basically boils down to a society in which people reap the rewards of their skill and effort. But as countless advocates for women and minorities in the tech world have pointed out, meritocracies are a lot messier in real life. The tech industry isn’t still predominantly white and male because white men are better at their jobs than everyone else, it’s because many white men have had more opportunities to succeed than their minority and female counterparts.

Or maybe it’s because more men are choosing high tech careers? That, apparently is unthinkable. It just has to be sexism.

And GitHub, which proclaims that it has no hierarchy, turns out to be a horribly sexist place, apparently, for the very same Julie Ann Horvath who banned the meritocracy rug has resigned from GitHub. CNN Money reports:

GitHub engineer Julia Ann Horvath has announced she's leaving the company due to gender-based harassment, the latest development in an ongoing sexism problem in the technology industry.

Horvath had worked as a designer at the startup, which hosts open-source software for developers. She posted her decision to leave the company on Twitter on Friday.

"I've been harassed by 'leadership' at GitHub for two years," she wrote. "I'm incredibly happy to moving to join a more healthy work environment, with a team who doesn't tolerate harassment of their peers."

Horvath, who did not respond to CNNMoney's request for comment, told TechCrunch she was treated differently because of her gender. In the interview, Horvath also said she'd been intimidated by the wife of one of GitHub's founders, she was accused of poor judgment for her decision to date a coworker.

I don't know about you, but I prefer to deal with companies that believe in meritocracy.

 

The feminist left may be crazy, but it is powerful. Witness what happened in San Francisco at a fast-growing company that is a web-based hosting service for software development named GitHub. (hat tip: Instapundit). Via readwrite.com:

You might not immediately notice the latest change to come to GitHub unless you’re standing in its San Francisco headquarters and looking down at the floor. GitHub has removed the centerpiece of its faux Oval Office waiting room, a circular mat emblazoned with the phrase, “United Meritocracy of GitHub.”

The purported problem with meritocracy was developed in feminist online discussion forums, and forcefully advocated by a GitHub employee:

GitHub's Julie Ann Horvath, a designer who also founded the company's all-female lecture series Passion Projects, said the rug first became a problem when photos of it made their way into feminist discussions online.

Readwrite’s Lauern Orsini attempts to explain:

In theory, a meritocracy should be a good thing. It basically boils down to a society in which people reap the rewards of their skill and effort. But as countless advocates for women and minorities in the tech world have pointed out, meritocracies are a lot messier in real life. The tech industry isn’t still predominantly white and male because white men are better at their jobs than everyone else, it’s because many white men have had more opportunities to succeed than their minority and female counterparts.

Or maybe it’s because more men are choosing high tech careers? That, apparently is unthinkable. It just has to be sexism.

And GitHub, which proclaims that it has no hierarchy, turns out to be a horribly sexist place, apparently, for the very same Julie Ann Horvath who banned the meritocracy rug has resigned from GitHub. CNN Money reports:

GitHub engineer Julia Ann Horvath has announced she's leaving the company due to gender-based harassment, the latest development in an ongoing sexism problem in the technology industry.

Horvath had worked as a designer at the startup, which hosts open-source software for developers. She posted her decision to leave the company on Twitter on Friday.

"I've been harassed by 'leadership' at GitHub for two years," she wrote. "I'm incredibly happy to moving to join a more healthy work environment, with a team who doesn't tolerate harassment of their peers."

Horvath, who did not respond to CNNMoney's request for comment, told TechCrunch she was treated differently because of her gender. In the interview, Horvath also said she'd been intimidated by the wife of one of GitHub's founders, she was accused of poor judgment for her decision to date a coworker.

I don't know about you, but I prefer to deal with companies that believe in meritocracy.