Wendy Davis sticks to her fatally flawed story

Rick Moran
I guess some politicians bank on the fact that details don't matter to most voters and telling lies about your past won't hurt them in the long run.

For Texas gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis, the holes poked in her dramatic - and untrue - life story won't be filled. She will continue to include the misinformation in her ads and speeches.

Politico:

"Mine is a story about a teenage single mother who struggled to keep her young family afloat," Davis shot back in an open letter earlier this week. "It's a story about a young woman who was given a precious opportunity to work her way up in the world. It's a story about resiliency, and sacrifice, and perseverance. And you're damn right it's a true story."

That's her story and she's sticking to it. Unfortunately, most of it is a lie or a gross exaggeration. But that won't deter her from shamelessly using the story to tug at voters' heartstrings.

She will continue telling that story undeterred, say people close to Davis. Her team also sees an opportunity to continue hammering Abbott over education spending cuts, an issue that is playing out as part of a high-profile school finance lawsuit that the attorney general's office is handling, though he isn't directly involved.

"From a strategic perspective, the best way to deal with it is to go right back to Greg Abbott," said someone intimately familiar with the campaign's strategy. "The game plan is, 'Here is Greg Abbott, right now, [tied to] the court room, fighting to defend cuts to public education.'"

The source added, "That's where we are strongest, when we are talking about issues like education, and that's what we're going to continue to do."

Matt Hirsch, a spokesman for the Abbott campaign, responded that the attorney general "will lead a transformation in education that will get Texas schools out of the courts and empower teachers, principals and parents to provide a better education for our children."

Abbott has personally shied away from dwelling on the discrepancies highlighted over the last week, though his campaign charged that Davis has "systematically, intentionally and repeatedly deceived Texans for years about her background, yet she expects voters to indulge her fanciful narrative."

Can she get away with it? Why not. Unless Abbott is willing to call her out every day for it, the voters will soon accept the bogus story as true.

The real question is will it make a difference? This isn't likely as Davis, who won her political spurs for opposing a midly restrictive abortion bill, is out of step with Texans on just about every issue. My guess is that all the outside money she's collecting from radical pro-abortion groups will end up hurting her in the end.



I guess some politicians bank on the fact that details don't matter to most voters and telling lies about your past won't hurt them in the long run.

For Texas gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis, the holes poked in her dramatic - and untrue - life story won't be filled. She will continue to include the misinformation in her ads and speeches.

Politico:

"Mine is a story about a teenage single mother who struggled to keep her young family afloat," Davis shot back in an open letter earlier this week. "It's a story about a young woman who was given a precious opportunity to work her way up in the world. It's a story about resiliency, and sacrifice, and perseverance. And you're damn right it's a true story."

That's her story and she's sticking to it. Unfortunately, most of it is a lie or a gross exaggeration. But that won't deter her from shamelessly using the story to tug at voters' heartstrings.

She will continue telling that story undeterred, say people close to Davis. Her team also sees an opportunity to continue hammering Abbott over education spending cuts, an issue that is playing out as part of a high-profile school finance lawsuit that the attorney general's office is handling, though he isn't directly involved.

"From a strategic perspective, the best way to deal with it is to go right back to Greg Abbott," said someone intimately familiar with the campaign's strategy. "The game plan is, 'Here is Greg Abbott, right now, [tied to] the court room, fighting to defend cuts to public education.'"

The source added, "That's where we are strongest, when we are talking about issues like education, and that's what we're going to continue to do."

Matt Hirsch, a spokesman for the Abbott campaign, responded that the attorney general "will lead a transformation in education that will get Texas schools out of the courts and empower teachers, principals and parents to provide a better education for our children."

Abbott has personally shied away from dwelling on the discrepancies highlighted over the last week, though his campaign charged that Davis has "systematically, intentionally and repeatedly deceived Texans for years about her background, yet she expects voters to indulge her fanciful narrative."

Can she get away with it? Why not. Unless Abbott is willing to call her out every day for it, the voters will soon accept the bogus story as true.

The real question is will it make a difference? This isn't likely as Davis, who won her political spurs for opposing a midly restrictive abortion bill, is out of step with Texans on just about every issue. My guess is that all the outside money she's collecting from radical pro-abortion groups will end up hurting her in the end.