EU backing away from warmist agenda

Thomas Lifson
The persistent failure of the earth's weather to fulfill the catastrophic predictions of the warmist climate modelers for the last 17 years is taking its toll. So, too, the extreme cost of reducing those carbon emissions that have increased dramatically over that period of no warming. As result, the EU and its biggest economic power Germany are backing away from the previously announced goals. Der Spiegel is wringing its hands over the situation:

The EU's reputation as a model of environmental responsibility may soon be history. The European Commission wants to forgo ambitious climate protection goals and pave the way for fracking -- jeopardizing Germany's touted energy revolution in the process.

The climate between Brussels and Berlin is polluted, something European Commission officials attribute, among other things, to the "reckless" way German Chancellor Angela Merkel blocked stricter exhaust emissions during her re-election campaign to placate domestic automotive manufacturers like Daimler and BMW. This kind of blatant self-interest, officials complained at the time, is poisoning the climate.

But now it seems that the climate is no longer of much importance to the European Commission, the EU's executive branch, either. Commission sources have long been hinting that the body intends to move away from ambitious climate protection goals. On Tuesday, the Süddeutsche Zeitung reported as much.

Boo-hoo. It's  a fraud and it's time to cut our losses. Get over it, greenies, including you at Der Spiegel. Reality is superceding your agenda.

Saudi Arabia and the other oil oligarchs are taking it on the chin, too. Fracking, which will break their oligopoly and enrich a swath of democratic countries from America to Poland to Britain to Israel, is melting away its opposition:

In addition, the authority wants to pave the way in the EU for the controversial practice of fracking, according to the daily Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. The report says the Commission does not intend to establish strict rules for the extraction of shale gas, but only minimum health and environmental standards.

Altogether a lot of good news.

Now maybe it'stime to address the threat of global cooling.

 

The persistent failure of the earth's weather to fulfill the catastrophic predictions of the warmist climate modelers for the last 17 years is taking its toll. So, too, the extreme cost of reducing those carbon emissions that have increased dramatically over that period of no warming. As result, the EU and its biggest economic power Germany are backing away from the previously announced goals. Der Spiegel is wringing its hands over the situation:

The EU's reputation as a model of environmental responsibility may soon be history. The European Commission wants to forgo ambitious climate protection goals and pave the way for fracking -- jeopardizing Germany's touted energy revolution in the process.

The climate between Brussels and Berlin is polluted, something European Commission officials attribute, among other things, to the "reckless" way German Chancellor Angela Merkel blocked stricter exhaust emissions during her re-election campaign to placate domestic automotive manufacturers like Daimler and BMW. This kind of blatant self-interest, officials complained at the time, is poisoning the climate.

But now it seems that the climate is no longer of much importance to the European Commission, the EU's executive branch, either. Commission sources have long been hinting that the body intends to move away from ambitious climate protection goals. On Tuesday, the Süddeutsche Zeitung reported as much.

Boo-hoo. It's  a fraud and it's time to cut our losses. Get over it, greenies, including you at Der Spiegel. Reality is superceding your agenda.

Saudi Arabia and the other oil oligarchs are taking it on the chin, too. Fracking, which will break their oligopoly and enrich a swath of democratic countries from America to Poland to Britain to Israel, is melting away its opposition:

In addition, the authority wants to pave the way in the EU for the controversial practice of fracking, according to the daily Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. The report says the Commission does not intend to establish strict rules for the extraction of shale gas, but only minimum health and environmental standards.

Altogether a lot of good news.

Now maybe it'stime to address the threat of global cooling.