Voting fraud in Iowa

One of the talking points of the left in fighting identity verification for voting is the contention that there is "no evidence" of voter fraud. Well, how about this? Shellie Nelson of WQAD:

Two people face criminal charges for allegedly registering and voting without valid U.S. citizenship.

Muscatine County Alan Ostergren filed allegations of first-degree election misconduct against Mayra Alejandra Lopez Morales and Sylvia Rada, both of Muscatine, Iowa. The felony charges were filed December 4, 2013.

Both women are accused of registering to vote and of voting in the 2012 general election while being non-citizens.

Gee, I wonder who they voted for?  Keep in mind that their votes in effect denied the right to vote to people who voted the other way. For the "count every vote" crowd, this arithmetical relationship is apparently too complicated.

I hope they are prosecuted, and if convicted, sentenced to the maximum term. First-degree election misconduct in Iowa is a class D felony.

Update: Mark Roth writes: A "class D felony" in Iowa carries a possible five (5) year prison term and a fine of $750 - $7,500.

Hat tip: David Paulin

One of the talking points of the left in fighting identity verification for voting is the contention that there is "no evidence" of voter fraud. Well, how about this? Shellie Nelson of WQAD:

Two people face criminal charges for allegedly registering and voting without valid U.S. citizenship.

Muscatine County Alan Ostergren filed allegations of first-degree election misconduct against Mayra Alejandra Lopez Morales and Sylvia Rada, both of Muscatine, Iowa. The felony charges were filed December 4, 2013.

Both women are accused of registering to vote and of voting in the 2012 general election while being non-citizens.

Gee, I wonder who they voted for?  Keep in mind that their votes in effect denied the right to vote to people who voted the other way. For the "count every vote" crowd, this arithmetical relationship is apparently too complicated.

I hope they are prosecuted, and if convicted, sentenced to the maximum term. First-degree election misconduct in Iowa is a class D felony.

Update: Mark Roth writes: A "class D felony" in Iowa carries a possible five (5) year prison term and a fine of $750 - $7,500.

Hat tip: David Paulin

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