Robert Reich and the politics of envy

Thomas Lifson
Kevin Williamson pens a devastating takedown of Robert Reich, one of the most annoyingly self-righteous left-liberals in the Democrat-academia-media firmament.

Robert Reich [who has] practically made a cult of envy, has taken to abusing the well-off for their acts of charity. Professor Reich, a ward of the taxpayers of California (at $246,199.84 per annum) and a federal ward before that, is persistently unhappy about how other people use their money, and he scoffs that America's rich philanthropists are phony and self-serving, investing too much in opera and ballet and fancy colleges, and too little in feeding the hungry and housing the homeless. He particularly resents the fact that our tax code encourages such giving, with deductions that reduced federal revenue by some $39 billion last year - federal revenue that could have gone toward employing men such as Robert Reich.

After analyzing Reich's misleading claims about the disproportionate tax advantages realized by the wealthy through the deductibility of charitable contributions from taxable income (because Reich fails to compare the deductions to the amount donated), Williamson writes:

Beyond stealing altar offerings from the almighty god of revenue, our philanthropists offend Professor Reich's sensibilities in another way: They don't give to the sort of enterprises he wants them to give to. "A large portion of the charitable deductions now claimed by America's wealthy are for donations to culture palaces - operas, art museums, symphonies, and theaters - where they spend their leisure time hobnobbing with other wealthy benefactors. . . . These aren't really charities as most people understand the term. They're often investments in the life-styles the wealthy already enjoy and want their children to have as well. Increasingly, being rich in America means not having to come across anyone who's not." Unsurprisingly, Progressive America's favorite non-economist-who-plays-an-economist-on-TV does not bother to document what he means by "a large share." Giving to art-and-culture organizations amounted to just over $14 billion in 2012, or about 4.5 percent of charitable contributions, far less than was given to health, human-services, or public-benefit organizations. 

Reich is a man consumed with resentment toward those whose wealth exceeds his own. Williamson nails him:

Megan McArdle once observed that in our public discourse, "very rich" is defined as "just above the level a top-notch journalist in a two-earner couple could be expected to pull down." There is no envy like the envy of a $250,000 man in a world of $250 million men

 

Kevin Williamson pens a devastating takedown of Robert Reich, one of the most annoyingly self-righteous left-liberals in the Democrat-academia-media firmament.

Robert Reich [who has] practically made a cult of envy, has taken to abusing the well-off for their acts of charity. Professor Reich, a ward of the taxpayers of California (at $246,199.84 per annum) and a federal ward before that, is persistently unhappy about how other people use their money, and he scoffs that America's rich philanthropists are phony and self-serving, investing too much in opera and ballet and fancy colleges, and too little in feeding the hungry and housing the homeless. He particularly resents the fact that our tax code encourages such giving, with deductions that reduced federal revenue by some $39 billion last year - federal revenue that could have gone toward employing men such as Robert Reich.

After analyzing Reich's misleading claims about the disproportionate tax advantages realized by the wealthy through the deductibility of charitable contributions from taxable income (because Reich fails to compare the deductions to the amount donated), Williamson writes:

Beyond stealing altar offerings from the almighty god of revenue, our philanthropists offend Professor Reich's sensibilities in another way: They don't give to the sort of enterprises he wants them to give to. "A large portion of the charitable deductions now claimed by America's wealthy are for donations to culture palaces - operas, art museums, symphonies, and theaters - where they spend their leisure time hobnobbing with other wealthy benefactors. . . . These aren't really charities as most people understand the term. They're often investments in the life-styles the wealthy already enjoy and want their children to have as well. Increasingly, being rich in America means not having to come across anyone who's not." Unsurprisingly, Progressive America's favorite non-economist-who-plays-an-economist-on-TV does not bother to document what he means by "a large share." Giving to art-and-culture organizations amounted to just over $14 billion in 2012, or about 4.5 percent of charitable contributions, far less than was given to health, human-services, or public-benefit organizations. 

Reich is a man consumed with resentment toward those whose wealth exceeds his own. Williamson nails him:

Megan McArdle once observed that in our public discourse, "very rich" is defined as "just above the level a top-notch journalist in a two-earner couple could be expected to pull down." There is no envy like the envy of a $250,000 man in a world of $250 million men