Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt once again designated a terror group

Rick Moran
Perhaps we should refer to this day as "The day the Arab Spring became Winter."

The Egyptian government announced it was designating the Muslim Brotherhood a terror group, thus bringing the Islamists fulll circle from where they began prior to the revolution. Named a terrorist group under former President Mubarak, they were legalized in 2011 following the revoltution, took power, lost it, and now, once again, have been named as terrorists.

The Hill:

The move comes months after the military removed Mohammed Morsi from the presidency. Morsi was the Muslim Brotherhood's candidate in the 2012 election.

The new government's minister of education read a statement announcing the decision, which will give more power to authorities to crack down on the group.

"The Cabinet has declared the Muslim Brotherhood group and its organization as a terrorist organization," the statement from Minister of Higher Education Hossam Elssa read, according to a Fox News report.

The organization has long been a power in Egypt, and was an illegal group in that country until after the 2011 revolution that toppled President Hosni Mubarak. But under Morsi, serious opposition developed against the group.

The decision to lable it a terrorist organization comes a day after a bombing the government has blamed on the group, which has organized daily protests since Morsi was overthrown. 

Tuesday's bombing hit a police headquarters in a Nile Delta City. Sixteen people were killed in the attack, and more than 100 were wounded. 

Elssa blamed the attack on the Muslim Brotherhood in his statement. 

"Egypt was horrified from north to south by the hideous crime committed by the Muslim Brotherhood group," he said. "This was in context of dangerous escalation to violence against Egypt and Egyptians (and) a clear declaration by the Muslim Brotherhood group that it is still knows nothing but violence.

"It's not possible for Egypt the state nor Egypt the people to submit to the Muslim Brotherhood terrorism," he added.

Al Nour, the party of the Salifists, is still legal - at least for the time being. There is talk of banning all religious parties in the new constitution.

The problem is simple. The most recent election saw nearly 70% of voters casting their ballot for the Brotherhood or Al Nour. That number would probably decline today, but it's almost certain that a majority would still favor Islamist parties.

Declaring the Brotherhood terrorists is one thing. Getting the ordinary Egyptian to abandon them is an entirely different matter. Egypt will not be stable until the various factions can figure out how to include all without any one dominating. This is a tall order for the Islamists who can't abide opposition to Islam. So until the Brotherhood learns its lesson, it will find itself on the sideliness - banned and outlawed.


Perhaps we should refer to this day as "The day the Arab Spring became Winter."

The Egyptian government announced it was designating the Muslim Brotherhood a terror group, thus bringing the Islamists fulll circle from where they began prior to the revolution. Named a terrorist group under former President Mubarak, they were legalized in 2011 following the revoltution, took power, lost it, and now, once again, have been named as terrorists.

The Hill:

The move comes months after the military removed Mohammed Morsi from the presidency. Morsi was the Muslim Brotherhood's candidate in the 2012 election.

The new government's minister of education read a statement announcing the decision, which will give more power to authorities to crack down on the group.

"The Cabinet has declared the Muslim Brotherhood group and its organization as a terrorist organization," the statement from Minister of Higher Education Hossam Elssa read, according to a Fox News report.

The organization has long been a power in Egypt, and was an illegal group in that country until after the 2011 revolution that toppled President Hosni Mubarak. But under Morsi, serious opposition developed against the group.

The decision to lable it a terrorist organization comes a day after a bombing the government has blamed on the group, which has organized daily protests since Morsi was overthrown. 

Tuesday's bombing hit a police headquarters in a Nile Delta City. Sixteen people were killed in the attack, and more than 100 were wounded. 

Elssa blamed the attack on the Muslim Brotherhood in his statement. 

"Egypt was horrified from north to south by the hideous crime committed by the Muslim Brotherhood group," he said. "This was in context of dangerous escalation to violence against Egypt and Egyptians (and) a clear declaration by the Muslim Brotherhood group that it is still knows nothing but violence.

"It's not possible for Egypt the state nor Egypt the people to submit to the Muslim Brotherhood terrorism," he added.

Al Nour, the party of the Salifists, is still legal - at least for the time being. There is talk of banning all religious parties in the new constitution.

The problem is simple. The most recent election saw nearly 70% of voters casting their ballot for the Brotherhood or Al Nour. That number would probably decline today, but it's almost certain that a majority would still favor Islamist parties.

Declaring the Brotherhood terrorists is one thing. Getting the ordinary Egyptian to abandon them is an entirely different matter. Egypt will not be stable until the various factions can figure out how to include all without any one dominating. This is a tall order for the Islamists who can't abide opposition to Islam. So until the Brotherhood learns its lesson, it will find itself on the sideliness - banned and outlawed.