Millenials rejecting Obama, Obamacare: Pew

A new USA Today/Pew poll is out and the most startling news to come out of the survey is the attitude of millenials and how it has changed since the election last year.

For the first time, more young people disapprove of the job Obama is doing than approve. And the gap has widened between those who support Obamacare and those who oppose it.

USA Today:

Forty-five percent of 18- to 29-year-old Americans say they approve of the way Obama is handling his job; 46% disapprove of his job performance, according to a year-end USA TODAY/Pew Research Center Poll. The president's approval rating with young Americans - which stood at 67% just ahead of his second inauguration less than a year ago - now mirrors the general population, according to the poll.

The USA TODAY/Pew sample is of only 229 young Americans -- a subset of 2,001 adults polled from Dec. 3-8 -- and has a margin of error of +/- 8 percentage points.

But the findings mirror other recent polling that suggests Obama has seen his approval rating slide with young Americans.

--Forty-nine percent of adults age 18-34 disapprove of the job Obama is doing as president, and 45% approve, according to a Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll released last week.

--A Harvard Institute of Politics poll published earlier this month found that Obama's approval rating with 18- to 29-year-olds now stands at 41%, a dramatic 11-point drop from April. Fifty-four percent said they disapprove of the president's performance. That poll has a margin of error of +/- 2.1 percentage points.

--In a Quinnipiac University poll conducted from Dec. 3 to 9, 41% approve and 49% disapprove of his performance among the 18-to-29 age group.

In the USA TODAY/Pew poll, just 41% approve of his signature health care policy, while 54% disapprove. Overall, 40% of Americans approve and 55% disapprove of his health care policy, according to the poll.

The tough polling numbers with young Americans offer a snapshot of the road ahead for the Obama administration in repairing damage caused by the troubled rollout of Obamacare, which has even worn on some of the president's most ardent supporters.

The administration has dedicated much of the president's time and political capital toward making implementation of Obamacare a success after battling with early problems -- the glitch-riddled online exchange and the outrage that ensued when millions of Americans on the individual insurance market received cancellation notices because their policies didn't meet minimum benefit requirements set by the law.

Are there enough young and healthy people who support Obamacare who would also sign up for insurance, thus offsetting the signing up of the old and sick? It doesn't appear that at this point, there are.

If this is the case, there will be enormous pressure placed on insurance companies to keep premium increases to a minimum next year. But this is only part of the problem. The government can't force companies to sell on the exchanges. If it becomes unprofitable to participate in the Obamacare exchanges, one imagines that most companies will refuse to do so. This would be just as bad as skyrocketing rates.

The rejection of Obamacare by young people may sound the death knell of Obamacare even before the GOP has a chance to repeal it.


A new USA Today/Pew poll is out and the most startling news to come out of the survey is the attitude of millenials and how it has changed since the election last year.

For the first time, more young people disapprove of the job Obama is doing than approve. And the gap has widened between those who support Obamacare and those who oppose it.

USA Today:

Forty-five percent of 18- to 29-year-old Americans say they approve of the way Obama is handling his job; 46% disapprove of his job performance, according to a year-end USA TODAY/Pew Research Center Poll. The president's approval rating with young Americans - which stood at 67% just ahead of his second inauguration less than a year ago - now mirrors the general population, according to the poll.

The USA TODAY/Pew sample is of only 229 young Americans -- a subset of 2,001 adults polled from Dec. 3-8 -- and has a margin of error of +/- 8 percentage points.

But the findings mirror other recent polling that suggests Obama has seen his approval rating slide with young Americans.

--Forty-nine percent of adults age 18-34 disapprove of the job Obama is doing as president, and 45% approve, according to a Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll released last week.

--A Harvard Institute of Politics poll published earlier this month found that Obama's approval rating with 18- to 29-year-olds now stands at 41%, a dramatic 11-point drop from April. Fifty-four percent said they disapprove of the president's performance. That poll has a margin of error of +/- 2.1 percentage points.

--In a Quinnipiac University poll conducted from Dec. 3 to 9, 41% approve and 49% disapprove of his performance among the 18-to-29 age group.

In the USA TODAY/Pew poll, just 41% approve of his signature health care policy, while 54% disapprove. Overall, 40% of Americans approve and 55% disapprove of his health care policy, according to the poll.

The tough polling numbers with young Americans offer a snapshot of the road ahead for the Obama administration in repairing damage caused by the troubled rollout of Obamacare, which has even worn on some of the president's most ardent supporters.

The administration has dedicated much of the president's time and political capital toward making implementation of Obamacare a success after battling with early problems -- the glitch-riddled online exchange and the outrage that ensued when millions of Americans on the individual insurance market received cancellation notices because their policies didn't meet minimum benefit requirements set by the law.

Are there enough young and healthy people who support Obamacare who would also sign up for insurance, thus offsetting the signing up of the old and sick? It doesn't appear that at this point, there are.

If this is the case, there will be enormous pressure placed on insurance companies to keep premium increases to a minimum next year. But this is only part of the problem. The government can't force companies to sell on the exchanges. If it becomes unprofitable to participate in the Obamacare exchanges, one imagines that most companies will refuse to do so. This would be just as bad as skyrocketing rates.

The rejection of Obamacare by young people may sound the death knell of Obamacare even before the GOP has a chance to repeal it.


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