In Chicago, convicted government workers are highly qualified for government jobs

To understand the Chicago political culture which trained and nurtured President Barack Obama (D), and to further understand how he could endlessly promise "If you like your insurance plan/doctor you can keep your insurance plan/doctor.  Period,"  just take a look at this ordinary headline buried in yesterday's Chicago paper:

Convicted political boss Al Sanchez running for Cook County board

Former Chicago Streets and Sanitation commissioner rigged hiring to benefit party's foot soldiers

And so the report matter of factly continues about those formerly convicted, filing to replace others newly convicted; just another political day in the life of Chicago which is located in C(r)ook County which is part of the state of Illinois.  All these government entities not so coincidentally have tanked bond ratings.  And, aside from a few complainers in the comments section, no one seems to feel there is anything wrong with these people running for office.  Indeed some might feel their stretch in prison is a qualification.

Former Chicago Streets and Sanitation Commissioner Al Sanchez, convicted on federal charges of rigging hiring to benefit political foot soldiers, filed Monday to run for the Cook County Board seat previously held by William Beavers - who is headed for prison.

(snip)

For some Cook County voters, the Democratic primary could become known as the election of second chances. Another convicted felon, former Chicago Ald. (alderman) Issac "Ike" Carothers, also filed for a primary bid for the County Board.

Sanchez, the former head of the Streets and Sanitation Department under Mayor Richard M. Daley, also formerly headed the once-powerful pro-Daley Hispanic Democratic Organization. He was the highest-ranking Daley appointee sent to prison following a lengthy federal investigation into hiring at City Hall. He was convicted in a scheme to steer city jobs and promotions to HDO members.

Sanchez said he took the fall for following the well-established Chicago political tradition of hiring people who came recommended by political benefactors. "I was a scapegoat for a system that was in place for decades, and it's still in place," he said.

"Yeah, I spent some time in a federal facility, but I think my record is pretty clear when you look at how I ran that department," he said.

Sanchez is among four Democrats who filed to run against Commissioner Stanley Moore, who was appointed in April to replace Beavers in the South Side and south suburban 4th District. Beavers was convicted of federal tax evasion and was scheduled to report to prison Monday.

Carothers was an alderman for 11 years until he resigned in 2010, around the same time he pleaded guilty to bribery and tax fraud. He admitted to backing a zoning change in exchange for $40,000 in work at his home and was sentenced to 28 months in prison.

Sanchez's contention "I was a scapegoat for a system that was in place for decades, and it's still in place," rings true.

His boss, former Mayor Richard M. Daley (D), remains untouched, living in a luxurious city condo that he somehow managed to afford on his paltry Chicago mayoral salary. Daley, who required intensive tutoring to finally pass the Illinois state bar on his third attempt is now counsel to a prestigious, high powered firm "where he draws on his vast knowledge, experience and relationships globally to contribute to the continued growth of the firm."  

This was the firm employed by Daley for a notorious parking meter deal that somehow benefited the parking meter company more than its client, the city, while Daley used most of the profits to pay off short term debt rather than investing them. His successor, former Obama senior advisor Rahm Emanuel (D), is now coping with a city whose credit rating tanked three grades on the day Detroit announced its bankruptcy.

Meanwhile, the little people who needed a political benefactor to get a city job - picking up garbage or removing snow - worked hard and usually did a fine job.  If not, their political benefactor boss would hear about it from the top boss because his constituents might get restless. And $40,000 for a zoning change which can be worth more in future benefits is certainly cheaper than hiring a lawyer who can't guarantee anything unless he bribes someone. 

In Chicago, a definition of an honest politician is, once he's bought, he stays bought and delivers.  Or as some explain using Italian dictator Mussolini as an example, yes, but he made sure the trains ran on time.  And picked up the garbage.  And removed the snow.  And reduced the murder rate.  Hmm, oh well, no one is perfect. 

So yeah, Sanchez and the others feel entitled to their high paying, low requirement jobs, jail time or not.  And they just might win.

With that background, Obama cannot understand why Obamacare can't work, won't work.  Why Republicans oppose him; don't they know they're hindering him from doing what he wants.  After all, he stopped the oceans from rising.

It must be racism and selfishness.  Yeah, that's it. 


To understand the Chicago political culture which trained and nurtured President Barack Obama (D), and to further understand how he could endlessly promise "If you like your insurance plan/doctor you can keep your insurance plan/doctor.  Period,"  just take a look at this ordinary headline buried in yesterday's Chicago paper:

Convicted political boss Al Sanchez running for Cook County board

Former Chicago Streets and Sanitation commissioner rigged hiring to benefit party's foot soldiers

And so the report matter of factly continues about those formerly convicted, filing to replace others newly convicted; just another political day in the life of Chicago which is located in C(r)ook County which is part of the state of Illinois.  All these government entities not so coincidentally have tanked bond ratings.  And, aside from a few complainers in the comments section, no one seems to feel there is anything wrong with these people running for office.  Indeed some might feel their stretch in prison is a qualification.

Former Chicago Streets and Sanitation Commissioner Al Sanchez, convicted on federal charges of rigging hiring to benefit political foot soldiers, filed Monday to run for the Cook County Board seat previously held by William Beavers - who is headed for prison.

(snip)

For some Cook County voters, the Democratic primary could become known as the election of second chances. Another convicted felon, former Chicago Ald. (alderman) Issac "Ike" Carothers, also filed for a primary bid for the County Board.

Sanchez, the former head of the Streets and Sanitation Department under Mayor Richard M. Daley, also formerly headed the once-powerful pro-Daley Hispanic Democratic Organization. He was the highest-ranking Daley appointee sent to prison following a lengthy federal investigation into hiring at City Hall. He was convicted in a scheme to steer city jobs and promotions to HDO members.

Sanchez said he took the fall for following the well-established Chicago political tradition of hiring people who came recommended by political benefactors. "I was a scapegoat for a system that was in place for decades, and it's still in place," he said.

"Yeah, I spent some time in a federal facility, but I think my record is pretty clear when you look at how I ran that department," he said.

Sanchez is among four Democrats who filed to run against Commissioner Stanley Moore, who was appointed in April to replace Beavers in the South Side and south suburban 4th District. Beavers was convicted of federal tax evasion and was scheduled to report to prison Monday.

Carothers was an alderman for 11 years until he resigned in 2010, around the same time he pleaded guilty to bribery and tax fraud. He admitted to backing a zoning change in exchange for $40,000 in work at his home and was sentenced to 28 months in prison.

Sanchez's contention "I was a scapegoat for a system that was in place for decades, and it's still in place," rings true.

His boss, former Mayor Richard M. Daley (D), remains untouched, living in a luxurious city condo that he somehow managed to afford on his paltry Chicago mayoral salary. Daley, who required intensive tutoring to finally pass the Illinois state bar on his third attempt is now counsel to a prestigious, high powered firm "where he draws on his vast knowledge, experience and relationships globally to contribute to the continued growth of the firm."  

This was the firm employed by Daley for a notorious parking meter deal that somehow benefited the parking meter company more than its client, the city, while Daley used most of the profits to pay off short term debt rather than investing them. His successor, former Obama senior advisor Rahm Emanuel (D), is now coping with a city whose credit rating tanked three grades on the day Detroit announced its bankruptcy.

Meanwhile, the little people who needed a political benefactor to get a city job - picking up garbage or removing snow - worked hard and usually did a fine job.  If not, their political benefactor boss would hear about it from the top boss because his constituents might get restless. And $40,000 for a zoning change which can be worth more in future benefits is certainly cheaper than hiring a lawyer who can't guarantee anything unless he bribes someone. 

In Chicago, a definition of an honest politician is, once he's bought, he stays bought and delivers.  Or as some explain using Italian dictator Mussolini as an example, yes, but he made sure the trains ran on time.  And picked up the garbage.  And removed the snow.  And reduced the murder rate.  Hmm, oh well, no one is perfect. 

So yeah, Sanchez and the others feel entitled to their high paying, low requirement jobs, jail time or not.  And they just might win.

With that background, Obama cannot understand why Obamacare can't work, won't work.  Why Republicans oppose him; don't they know they're hindering him from doing what he wants.  After all, he stopped the oceans from rising.

It must be racism and selfishness.  Yeah, that's it. 


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