CNN commentator 'can live with' Obama's lies

Thomas Lifson
Barack Obama's term in office is the first postmodern presidency, in which there are no truths, only narratives. So the truthfulness of his promises on keeping your health insurance and doctor matters not at all - and some are willing to say so explicitly. Witness this statement by CNN (and ESPN) commentator LZ Granderson:

"All Americans know politicians lie. The question is which lies can you live with? And, time and time again, Americans have said we can deal with the lies that President Obama tells us because we believe in his heart he has the best interest for the American people. Every president is going to lie to you. Every politician is going to lie to you. The question is which lies can you live with?"


Jim Hoft of Gateway Pundit notes, "The communists also believe 'the end justifies the means.'" [bold in originall

Quite true, but I think that another equally relevant concept is the "noble lie," as suggested by James Taranto of the Wall Street Journal. If it's been a while since you picked up Plato's Republic, let me remind you that Socrates claimed that noble lies "would have a good effect, making them more inclined to care for the state and one another."

 

Barack Obama's term in office is the first postmodern presidency, in which there are no truths, only narratives. So the truthfulness of his promises on keeping your health insurance and doctor matters not at all - and some are willing to say so explicitly. Witness this statement by CNN (and ESPN) commentator LZ Granderson:

"All Americans know politicians lie. The question is which lies can you live with? And, time and time again, Americans have said we can deal with the lies that President Obama tells us because we believe in his heart he has the best interest for the American people. Every president is going to lie to you. Every politician is going to lie to you. The question is which lies can you live with?"


Jim Hoft of Gateway Pundit notes, "The communists also believe 'the end justifies the means.'" [bold in originall

Quite true, but I think that another equally relevant concept is the "noble lie," as suggested by James Taranto of the Wall Street Journal. If it's been a while since you picked up Plato's Republic, let me remind you that Socrates claimed that noble lies "would have a good effect, making them more inclined to care for the state and one another."