White House, Dems blaming insurance companies for policy cancellations

No doubt this was poll-tested and run by a focus group or two because the entire Democratic party is now in lockstep blaming the insurance companies for cancellations that have come about because rules written by bureaucrats in the Obama administration.

Leading Democrats on the Hill have their talking points and they're sticking with them:

"Insurance companies cancel insurance policies. That's what they do," said Reid.

"You should talk to the insurance companies if they're dropping people," said Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota. "The idea here is to have affordable insurance to people that don't have it."

"I think whenever possible, they should be able to keep their plan," Klobuchar finally admitted.

"I don't think there's any surprises yet," said Senator Ben Cardin of Maryland of reports of insurance cancellations.  

"The free market did not change," Cardin added. "The ability of an insurance carrier or employer to maintain their plans was there, and some are taking other actions."

Cardin was the only senator asked by TWS to flatly reject the measure to let people keep the plans they had in 2013.  "I think it's just too early to look at changes for 2014," he said.

One senator was not willing to cede the point that many Americans would be losing their current health insurance plans. When asked if those folks who like their plans should be able to keep it, Jon Tester, Democrat from Montana, responded, "I think your premise is wrong."

What was wrong with the premise? "You said millions of people lost their health care," Tester responded.

What about news reports saying as much?

"They're wrong," Tester said. He continued, "I think what we've got is we've got a current system that we're moving out of that has a whole bunch of people who don't have insurance. We're going to try to get them insurance."

So was President Obama wrong when he said Americans could keep their insurance if they like it? Tester didn't say.

"Shut the door," he told the Capitol elevator operator. "I didn't pick that up."

Back at the White House, Jay Carney pushes the notion that it doesn't matter what the law said, it's insurance companies who are at fault:

ACOSTA: -- this is something that the president said time and again to sell the health care law to the American people, and it was something that reassured millions of Americans out there that their plan would not be changed. So it's not something that we're -- you know, we're just picking on one little thing here to make a big political point or complain -- (inaudible) -

CARNEY: Sure. All I ask -- all I ask is that when you do the report, you note that anybody who had a plan the day before the Affordable Care Act passed and was signed into law, and that -- and has not been thrown off that plan and had it replaced by their insurer, has not dropped coverage of their own volition and then purchased it again in the interim, but has had that plan, is grandfathered in and can keep that plan.

Will blaming the insurance companies work? For those Americans already predisposed (and conditioned) to believe the worst about business and businessmen, this will ring true. It's probably a big enough number as to prevent a total meltdown in Democratic support, which is the best the Dems can hope for at this point.

But it's a brazen lie - perhaps the most brazen lie the administration has ever pushed.

With the facts right in front of them - that these cancellations are the direct result of the way the law was written and the way that regulations are being applied by the government - there is no excuse for this lie to go unchallenged. To point out that insurance companies had no choice in the matter would be the least that the media could do to counter the lie.

Don't worry, though. I'm, sure Obama will find some way to blame the Republicans too.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky



No doubt this was poll-tested and run by a focus group or two because the entire Democratic party is now in lockstep blaming the insurance companies for cancellations that have come about because rules written by bureaucrats in the Obama administration.

Leading Democrats on the Hill have their talking points and they're sticking with them:

"Insurance companies cancel insurance policies. That's what they do," said Reid.

"You should talk to the insurance companies if they're dropping people," said Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota. "The idea here is to have affordable insurance to people that don't have it."

"I think whenever possible, they should be able to keep their plan," Klobuchar finally admitted.

"I don't think there's any surprises yet," said Senator Ben Cardin of Maryland of reports of insurance cancellations.  

"The free market did not change," Cardin added. "The ability of an insurance carrier or employer to maintain their plans was there, and some are taking other actions."

Cardin was the only senator asked by TWS to flatly reject the measure to let people keep the plans they had in 2013.  "I think it's just too early to look at changes for 2014," he said.

One senator was not willing to cede the point that many Americans would be losing their current health insurance plans. When asked if those folks who like their plans should be able to keep it, Jon Tester, Democrat from Montana, responded, "I think your premise is wrong."

What was wrong with the premise? "You said millions of people lost their health care," Tester responded.

What about news reports saying as much?

"They're wrong," Tester said. He continued, "I think what we've got is we've got a current system that we're moving out of that has a whole bunch of people who don't have insurance. We're going to try to get them insurance."

So was President Obama wrong when he said Americans could keep their insurance if they like it? Tester didn't say.

"Shut the door," he told the Capitol elevator operator. "I didn't pick that up."

Back at the White House, Jay Carney pushes the notion that it doesn't matter what the law said, it's insurance companies who are at fault:

ACOSTA: -- this is something that the president said time and again to sell the health care law to the American people, and it was something that reassured millions of Americans out there that their plan would not be changed. So it's not something that we're -- you know, we're just picking on one little thing here to make a big political point or complain -- (inaudible) -

CARNEY: Sure. All I ask -- all I ask is that when you do the report, you note that anybody who had a plan the day before the Affordable Care Act passed and was signed into law, and that -- and has not been thrown off that plan and had it replaced by their insurer, has not dropped coverage of their own volition and then purchased it again in the interim, but has had that plan, is grandfathered in and can keep that plan.

Will blaming the insurance companies work? For those Americans already predisposed (and conditioned) to believe the worst about business and businessmen, this will ring true. It's probably a big enough number as to prevent a total meltdown in Democratic support, which is the best the Dems can hope for at this point.

But it's a brazen lie - perhaps the most brazen lie the administration has ever pushed.

With the facts right in front of them - that these cancellations are the direct result of the way the law was written and the way that regulations are being applied by the government - there is no excuse for this lie to go unchallenged. To point out that insurance companies had no choice in the matter would be the least that the media could do to counter the lie.

Don't worry, though. I'm, sure Obama will find some way to blame the Republicans too.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky



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