The immigration marches did not have a lot of marchers

Silvio Canto, Jr.
Saturday was supposed to be the day of the big immigration march, according to SEIU planners:  

"On October 5, 2013, the broadest and most diverse movement in our country right now will bring together diverse communities from immigrant, faith, labor, and civil rights groups. Thousands will join in over 90 marches and rallies across our nation to call on Congress to pass commonsense immigration reform with a pathway to earned citizenship in 2013."

It was supposed to be the day that Congress got the message about immigration reform, according to other planners.

Let's just say that many stayed home or didn't get the memo.  It had to be a disappointment because there were not the large crowds that the planners had hoped for.

My guess is that this is further evidence that Hispanics are disenchanted with Democrats who make promises and do not fulfill them, such as President Obama doing nothing about immigration reform despite huge congressional majorities.

Also, let's consider that Hispanics want to hear about jobs and economic development, the two missing ingredients of the Obama presidency.

According to The NY Times

"On what they were calling a "National Day of Immigrant Dignity and Respect," supporters said they expected as many as 100,000 people nationwide."

Frankly, 100,000 is a huge disappointment. We had a bigger crowd than that in Dallas in 2006.

Here are some reports from two major cities.

In Chicago:    

"Dozens gathered in Union Park on the Near West Side for the rally, held as part of a series of similar events across the country and after House Democrats unveiled an immigration bill during this week's ongoing government shutdown. "

In Los Angeles:  

"......hundreds of activists who marched in Hollywood on Saturday advocating for new immigration laws."

The LA march was apparently around 2,000, according to a later news report.

You are going to need a lot more than "hundreds" and "dozens" to catch the attention of politicians, especially with President Obama at 41% in Gallup.

Here is an idea for the march organizers:  Talk about jobs and maybe more people will show up. The Obama economy has been a disaster for Hispanics, blacks and young people, as Stephen Moore said.

You can hear CANTO TALK here.


Saturday was supposed to be the day of the big immigration march, according to SEIU planners:  

"On October 5, 2013, the broadest and most diverse movement in our country right now will bring together diverse communities from immigrant, faith, labor, and civil rights groups. Thousands will join in over 90 marches and rallies across our nation to call on Congress to pass commonsense immigration reform with a pathway to earned citizenship in 2013."

It was supposed to be the day that Congress got the message about immigration reform, according to other planners.

Let's just say that many stayed home or didn't get the memo.  It had to be a disappointment because there were not the large crowds that the planners had hoped for.

My guess is that this is further evidence that Hispanics are disenchanted with Democrats who make promises and do not fulfill them, such as President Obama doing nothing about immigration reform despite huge congressional majorities.

Also, let's consider that Hispanics want to hear about jobs and economic development, the two missing ingredients of the Obama presidency.

According to The NY Times

"On what they were calling a "National Day of Immigrant Dignity and Respect," supporters said they expected as many as 100,000 people nationwide."

Frankly, 100,000 is a huge disappointment. We had a bigger crowd than that in Dallas in 2006.

Here are some reports from two major cities.

In Chicago:    

"Dozens gathered in Union Park on the Near West Side for the rally, held as part of a series of similar events across the country and after House Democrats unveiled an immigration bill during this week's ongoing government shutdown. "

In Los Angeles:  

"......hundreds of activists who marched in Hollywood on Saturday advocating for new immigration laws."

The LA march was apparently around 2,000, according to a later news report.

You are going to need a lot more than "hundreds" and "dozens" to catch the attention of politicians, especially with President Obama at 41% in Gallup.

Here is an idea for the march organizers:  Talk about jobs and maybe more people will show up. The Obama economy has been a disaster for Hispanics, blacks and young people, as Stephen Moore said.

You can hear CANTO TALK here.