Peace in Our Time, 75 years later

That's the title Richard Baehr chose for his trenchant analysis of President Obama's Iran policy, comparing it to Chamberlain's appeasement of Hitler at Munich. Writing for Israel Hayom, the largest newspaper in that country, he writes:

It is fitting that on the 75th anniversary of the appeasement at Munich, which enabled Adolf Hitler to seize parts of Czechoslovakia without a fight, the current presumed "leader of the free world," President Barack Obama of the United States, has decided that the avoidance of war with Iran is now the principal goal of American foreign policy. If that means Iran joins the nuclear weapons club, so be it. Obama may be the most incompetent president since Jimmy Carter, but that is only if one grades him on a traditional scale, assuming the president wants the country to continue its leadership role abroad, and remain strong economically at home. If, however, the president has different objectives -- to pull America back from its overseas role, and to create a dependency nation at home, increasingly tied to government largesse, then the president's term in office may be judged a wild success. (Snip)

The president has jumped at the opportunity provided him by the appearance of a more moderate Iranian leadership, to charge into a negotiating process that will inevitably result in more time for Iran to weaponize its nuclear program (it already has enough enriched uranium for seven to nine bombs). The president has put Congress on notice that he wants no new sanctions imposed on Iran during this "delicate" negotiating period. Sanctions have taken a toll on Iran, which is of course why the regime is willing to give the appearance of a new openness and moderation in order both to stave off new sanctions, and to get some existing ones removed. The removal of sanctions will likely require some Iranian concessions, but these too may be illusory. After all, the West, and particularly Obama, are anxious for a deal, to be able to throw Iran into the same pile as Syria and Iraq and Afghanistan of foreign problems "removed from sight since we don't want to fight," so illusion will trump reality here, just as it did with the rapid about-face on Syria.

There's more. Well worth a read.

 

That's the title Richard Baehr chose for his trenchant analysis of President Obama's Iran policy, comparing it to Chamberlain's appeasement of Hitler at Munich. Writing for Israel Hayom, the largest newspaper in that country, he writes:

It is fitting that on the 75th anniversary of the appeasement at Munich, which enabled Adolf Hitler to seize parts of Czechoslovakia without a fight, the current presumed "leader of the free world," President Barack Obama of the United States, has decided that the avoidance of war with Iran is now the principal goal of American foreign policy. If that means Iran joins the nuclear weapons club, so be it. Obama may be the most incompetent president since Jimmy Carter, but that is only if one grades him on a traditional scale, assuming the president wants the country to continue its leadership role abroad, and remain strong economically at home. If, however, the president has different objectives -- to pull America back from its overseas role, and to create a dependency nation at home, increasingly tied to government largesse, then the president's term in office may be judged a wild success. (Snip)

The president has jumped at the opportunity provided him by the appearance of a more moderate Iranian leadership, to charge into a negotiating process that will inevitably result in more time for Iran to weaponize its nuclear program (it already has enough enriched uranium for seven to nine bombs). The president has put Congress on notice that he wants no new sanctions imposed on Iran during this "delicate" negotiating period. Sanctions have taken a toll on Iran, which is of course why the regime is willing to give the appearance of a new openness and moderation in order both to stave off new sanctions, and to get some existing ones removed. The removal of sanctions will likely require some Iranian concessions, but these too may be illusory. After all, the West, and particularly Obama, are anxious for a deal, to be able to throw Iran into the same pile as Syria and Iraq and Afghanistan of foreign problems "removed from sight since we don't want to fight," so illusion will trump reality here, just as it did with the rapid about-face on Syria.

There's more. Well worth a read.

 

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