No Cavalry Is Coming

Fiscal conservatives wait in vain for the GOP Cavalry to rescue America from further growth in the federal debt, for there is no Cavalry coming.

An American Thinker (AT) piece, posted on July 5, 2012, entitled "If the GOP Cavalry Doesn't Come," suggested that, in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's ObamaCare decision, conservatives awaited the arrival of the GOP Cavalry after a Republican victory in November 2012. 

The hoped-for Cavalry could, the article suggested, be a "troop of newly elected Republican congressional legislators who will ride into D.C. hell-bent-to-leather, determined to turn back the progressives who control the Democratic Party and the national agenda."

Then the July article asked, "What if that cavalry doesn't come? Or what if it arrives poorly armed, on lame horses, with dull leadership?"

If the GOP Cavalry failed to come, the article -- in a thinly veiled reference to the Tea Party movement -- looked toward "an alignment of like-minded grassroots organizations across the nation -- organizations who trace their ideological ancestry back to a group of Bostonians who dressed up not like Cavalry, but like Indians."

On August 6, 2012, another AT posting, entitled "The Morphing of the Tea Party," quoted an unnamed "Texas Tea Party activist" who, when asked what had become of the movement, said, "We put down our protest signs, and picked up campaign signs." He said that former House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's victory lap after passing Obamacare was a "wake-up call." It signaled that mass Tea Party demonstrations would not bring significant changes. Change would only come through the ballot box.

Michael Kinzie is the "Texas Tea Party activist" quoted in the August 2012 article. He is the founder and editor of the Texas-based website teaparty911.com.  Kinzie was one of several Texas Tea Party leaders and organizations that, along with Tea Party activists from across the country, sponsored the September 13, 2011, CNN Tea Party Republican Presidential Candidates' Debate.

Here's how Kinzie describes the Tea Party movement today:

"The Tea Party has been more infiltrated by progressive Republicans than by Democrats.

For example, an Austin Tea Party official irately demanded that all mention of her group be removed from our site because she supported Joe Straus. [Straus was elected Speaker of the Texas House in 2009 with 65 Democrat and 11 "moderate" Republican votes.]

The San Antonio Tea Party movement has split into two groups, one supports Tea Party-backed candidates, and the other supports more moderate Republicans.

The Tea Party would have to clean its own house before forming a party.

I've seen so much fighting among the major Tea Party groups that I don't see how they could ever work together. Most of them act like the "king duck" of their own little pond and don't want anyone else playing in their water."

Earlier this year, teaparty911.com ran a series of articles that documented instances across America where the GOP establishment, at county, state and national levels,  worked against Tea Party-backed candidates for the House of Representatives (here, here, here, here, and here), and the U.S. Senate (here). Kinzie's website also detailed the election of Illinois' new Democrat-lite State GOP Chairman here

Today, a speleologist Republican leadership is prone to cave in confrontations with Democrats. Consequently, at the end of this season's debt ceiling puppet show, the ceiling will go up, yet again.

Despite the President's surrealistic claim that a higher debt level doesn't mean more debt, the federal debt will go up, too, as politicians in both parties bemoan, for the umpteenth time, a debt destined to fall hard on future generations.

"Unsustainable" will sustain its central linguistic role in American political doublespeak.  

Meanwhile, we face the stark future described by David Stockman in his book The Great Deformation.

"The 2012 Presidential election signaled the onset of sundown in America, and not merely because an avowed big-spending statist won the race. Rather, it's because the Republican candidate proved in words and lifelong deeds that there is no conservative party left in America -- at least not one that is willing or able to defend sound money, free markets, and fiscal rectitude. So the drift into the crony capitalist end game will now accelerate, suffocating what remains of free market prosperity and honest political democracy." (p. 551)

The dust cloud over the horizon is not the Cavalry. Today, there is no Cavalry.

Fiscal conservatives wait in vain for the GOP Cavalry to rescue America from further growth in the federal debt, for there is no Cavalry coming.

An American Thinker (AT) piece, posted on July 5, 2012, entitled "If the GOP Cavalry Doesn't Come," suggested that, in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's ObamaCare decision, conservatives awaited the arrival of the GOP Cavalry after a Republican victory in November 2012. 

The hoped-for Cavalry could, the article suggested, be a "troop of newly elected Republican congressional legislators who will ride into D.C. hell-bent-to-leather, determined to turn back the progressives who control the Democratic Party and the national agenda."

Then the July article asked, "What if that cavalry doesn't come? Or what if it arrives poorly armed, on lame horses, with dull leadership?"

If the GOP Cavalry failed to come, the article -- in a thinly veiled reference to the Tea Party movement -- looked toward "an alignment of like-minded grassroots organizations across the nation -- organizations who trace their ideological ancestry back to a group of Bostonians who dressed up not like Cavalry, but like Indians."

On August 6, 2012, another AT posting, entitled "The Morphing of the Tea Party," quoted an unnamed "Texas Tea Party activist" who, when asked what had become of the movement, said, "We put down our protest signs, and picked up campaign signs." He said that former House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's victory lap after passing Obamacare was a "wake-up call." It signaled that mass Tea Party demonstrations would not bring significant changes. Change would only come through the ballot box.

Michael Kinzie is the "Texas Tea Party activist" quoted in the August 2012 article. He is the founder and editor of the Texas-based website teaparty911.com.  Kinzie was one of several Texas Tea Party leaders and organizations that, along with Tea Party activists from across the country, sponsored the September 13, 2011, CNN Tea Party Republican Presidential Candidates' Debate.

Here's how Kinzie describes the Tea Party movement today:

"The Tea Party has been more infiltrated by progressive Republicans than by Democrats.

For example, an Austin Tea Party official irately demanded that all mention of her group be removed from our site because she supported Joe Straus. [Straus was elected Speaker of the Texas House in 2009 with 65 Democrat and 11 "moderate" Republican votes.]

The San Antonio Tea Party movement has split into two groups, one supports Tea Party-backed candidates, and the other supports more moderate Republicans.

The Tea Party would have to clean its own house before forming a party.

I've seen so much fighting among the major Tea Party groups that I don't see how they could ever work together. Most of them act like the "king duck" of their own little pond and don't want anyone else playing in their water."

Earlier this year, teaparty911.com ran a series of articles that documented instances across America where the GOP establishment, at county, state and national levels,  worked against Tea Party-backed candidates for the House of Representatives (here, here, here, here, and here), and the U.S. Senate (here). Kinzie's website also detailed the election of Illinois' new Democrat-lite State GOP Chairman here

Today, a speleologist Republican leadership is prone to cave in confrontations with Democrats. Consequently, at the end of this season's debt ceiling puppet show, the ceiling will go up, yet again.

Despite the President's surrealistic claim that a higher debt level doesn't mean more debt, the federal debt will go up, too, as politicians in both parties bemoan, for the umpteenth time, a debt destined to fall hard on future generations.

"Unsustainable" will sustain its central linguistic role in American political doublespeak.  

Meanwhile, we face the stark future described by David Stockman in his book The Great Deformation.

"The 2012 Presidential election signaled the onset of sundown in America, and not merely because an avowed big-spending statist won the race. Rather, it's because the Republican candidate proved in words and lifelong deeds that there is no conservative party left in America -- at least not one that is willing or able to defend sound money, free markets, and fiscal rectitude. So the drift into the crony capitalist end game will now accelerate, suffocating what remains of free market prosperity and honest political democracy." (p. 551)

The dust cloud over the horizon is not the Cavalry. Today, there is no Cavalry.

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