Where is the coalition?

Silvio Canto, Jr.
Syria is a perfect case for multinational outrage and action.  

First, you have innocent people killed by chemical gas.  Second, it would give the UN an opportunity to enforce UN resolutions, "norms", "international law" or the simple idea that chemical weapons are off limits. 

Yet, the UN is tied up again and we can't blame it on Bush this time.  It makes you want to shut down the UN, cancel the diplomatic license plates and give everyone 90 days to pack up and go home.   

Wouldn't the UN tower make a wonderful office building?  

Why won't the international community stand up for common values, such as defending men, women and children killed by chemical weapons?

First, there is no such thing as an international community.   There are countries, regional alliances but not really a world order.  Russia and China have different interests in Syria than we do, for example.  North Korea has different interests in Cuba than we do.  And Iran has different objectives in Latin America than we do.  We are not one world community ready to sing "kumbaya" behind President Obama. 

Second, the world will not act without US leadership, and I don't mean military force.   The world sees a confused US leader who wants to be popular rather than relevant.  You get the feeling that Obama is still talking to that adoring crowd in Berlin 2008.  He does not understand that he is the president of the US or the leader of the free world.  He is still that guy telling Berliners what they wanted to hear that summer of 2008.

Want to see what the world looks like without US leadership?  Just turn on your TV or check out your morning front page.  

The only good news is that Americans may wise up the next time.  Maybe they won't scream "yes we can' the next time that some one blames the US for not listening to the world or showing arrogance.  Maybe they will walk out of the rally and say that the candidate is naive and silly.

 

Catch our chat with Jose M Guardia (Spain) and Bryan Lloyd French (Canada) about the lack of a coalition.  You can hear the show here.

 

 

Syria is a perfect case for multinational outrage and action.  

First, you have innocent people killed by chemical gas.  Second, it would give the UN an opportunity to enforce UN resolutions, "norms", "international law" or the simple idea that chemical weapons are off limits. 

Yet, the UN is tied up again and we can't blame it on Bush this time.  It makes you want to shut down the UN, cancel the diplomatic license plates and give everyone 90 days to pack up and go home.   

Wouldn't the UN tower make a wonderful office building?  

Why won't the international community stand up for common values, such as defending men, women and children killed by chemical weapons?

First, there is no such thing as an international community.   There are countries, regional alliances but not really a world order.  Russia and China have different interests in Syria than we do, for example.  North Korea has different interests in Cuba than we do.  And Iran has different objectives in Latin America than we do.  We are not one world community ready to sing "kumbaya" behind President Obama. 

Second, the world will not act without US leadership, and I don't mean military force.   The world sees a confused US leader who wants to be popular rather than relevant.  You get the feeling that Obama is still talking to that adoring crowd in Berlin 2008.  He does not understand that he is the president of the US or the leader of the free world.  He is still that guy telling Berliners what they wanted to hear that summer of 2008.

Want to see what the world looks like without US leadership?  Just turn on your TV or check out your morning front page.  

The only good news is that Americans may wise up the next time.  Maybe they won't scream "yes we can' the next time that some one blames the US for not listening to the world or showing arrogance.  Maybe they will walk out of the rally and say that the candidate is naive and silly.

 

Catch our chat with Jose M Guardia (Spain) and Bryan Lloyd French (Canada) about the lack of a coalition.  You can hear the show here.