Union bosses in the hated one percent

Thomas Lifson
A new report from Mediatrackers reveals that there are quite a few union bosses who have made their way into the hated one percent on the backs of dues their members have to fork up out of every paycheck. In fact, more than 400 union officials are being paid more than a quarter of a million dollars a year, and the upper reaches of that list go into seven figures. The very top end is dominated by professional athlete representatives, but most jarring are the multiple highly paid people representing laborers, boilermakers, and longshoremen. Take a look at the list of the one hundred top people that is near the beginning of the report.

The Daily Caller features a link to the report that asturely notes:

Boilermakers president Newton Jones, of Kansas, is the only official in the Top 10 who lives in a right-to-work state. The other nine live in Washington D.C., New York, and Illinois, where employees can be forced to join unions as a condition of employment.

In comparing the pay of union basses with their big business counterparts, always keep in mind that shareholders are the ones who ahve to pony up the money. They always have the possibility of selling their interest. Union members usually have no choice if they want to keep their job.

A new report from Mediatrackers reveals that there are quite a few union bosses who have made their way into the hated one percent on the backs of dues their members have to fork up out of every paycheck. In fact, more than 400 union officials are being paid more than a quarter of a million dollars a year, and the upper reaches of that list go into seven figures. The very top end is dominated by professional athlete representatives, but most jarring are the multiple highly paid people representing laborers, boilermakers, and longshoremen. Take a look at the list of the one hundred top people that is near the beginning of the report.

The Daily Caller features a link to the report that asturely notes:

Boilermakers president Newton Jones, of Kansas, is the only official in the Top 10 who lives in a right-to-work state. The other nine live in Washington D.C., New York, and Illinois, where employees can be forced to join unions as a condition of employment.

In comparing the pay of union basses with their big business counterparts, always keep in mind that shareholders are the ones who ahve to pony up the money. They always have the possibility of selling their interest. Union members usually have no choice if they want to keep their job.