Too Close for Comfort

This personality assessment was written by a noted historian about a major world leader. 

...gifted, with a quick understanding, sometimes brilliant, with a taste for the modern,-technology, industry, science-but at the same time superficial, hasty, restless, unable to relax, without any deeper level of seriousness, without any desire for hard work or drive to see things through to the end, without any sense of sobriety, for balance and boundaries, or even for reality and real problems, uncontrollable and scarcely capable of learning from experience, desperate for applause and success,...romantic, sentimental and theatrical, unsure and arrogant, with an immeasurably exaggerated self-confidence and desire to show off,

That sounds rather familiar.  Who do you suppose he was writing about? 

It is German Historian Thomas Nipperdey's assessment of Kaiser Wilhelm, II in his 1992 work  Rereading German History: From Unification to Reunification, 1800-1996,  It should be noted that Wilhelm II's unscripted moments, such as his infamous 1908 interview with th British paper The Daily Telegraph, also caused huge problems.  

Wilhelm II was also hailed as a peacemaker in by the New York Times only a year before the start of WWI.  Many historians attribute Kaiser Wilhelm's naval and colonial policies, which contributed to the growing tension among European nations, to his turbulent personal relations with his uncle King Edward VII, his cousin King George V and an intense dislike of his mother, the oldest child of Britain's Queen Victoria.   The 1908 interview was meant to smooth relations with Britain, yet it opened with this line.

"You English," he said, "are mad, mad, mad as March hares. What has come over you that you are so completely given over to suspicions quite unworthy of a great nation?

How do you say reset button in German?

 

This personality assessment was written by a noted historian about a major world leader. 

...gifted, with a quick understanding, sometimes brilliant, with a taste for the modern,-technology, industry, science-but at the same time superficial, hasty, restless, unable to relax, without any deeper level of seriousness, without any desire for hard work or drive to see things through to the end, without any sense of sobriety, for balance and boundaries, or even for reality and real problems, uncontrollable and scarcely capable of learning from experience, desperate for applause and success,...romantic, sentimental and theatrical, unsure and arrogant, with an immeasurably exaggerated self-confidence and desire to show off,

That sounds rather familiar.  Who do you suppose he was writing about? 

It is German Historian Thomas Nipperdey's assessment of Kaiser Wilhelm, II in his 1992 work  Rereading German History: From Unification to Reunification, 1800-1996,  It should be noted that Wilhelm II's unscripted moments, such as his infamous 1908 interview with th British paper The Daily Telegraph, also caused huge problems.  

Wilhelm II was also hailed as a peacemaker in by the New York Times only a year before the start of WWI.  Many historians attribute Kaiser Wilhelm's naval and colonial policies, which contributed to the growing tension among European nations, to his turbulent personal relations with his uncle King Edward VII, his cousin King George V and an intense dislike of his mother, the oldest child of Britain's Queen Victoria.   The 1908 interview was meant to smooth relations with Britain, yet it opened with this line.

"You English," he said, "are mad, mad, mad as March hares. What has come over you that you are so completely given over to suspicions quite unworthy of a great nation?

How do you say reset button in German?

 

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