'President' Elizabeth Warren?

Rick Moran
I wish I could comfort you and tell you that ultra-liberal Elizabeth Warren couldn't be president in a million years and that you're just having a bad dream if you are imagining it.

Unfortunately, you could have said the same thing about Barack Obama in 2005 and look what happened there.

Warren is set to open the AFL-CIO confab in Los Angles where there appears to be at least some speculatoon that Big Labor's favorite lap dog might be just what the Democratic party needs in 2016.

The Hill:

"The bottom line is, I think the world of her and I think the whole labor movement does. She is a woman of her word and she knows you never lose when you stand up for what's right," said Massachusetts AFL-CIO President Steve Tolman.

Union officials buzz when asked about Warren's 2016 prospects.

"I am not thinking about the presidency right now, but I do know we have the greatest U.S. senator representing us. I want her in the Senate doing the great work that she's doing," Tolman said. "Give me a couple more years and let me find out she's interested, and I will drive the train."

Warren is seemingly not interested in running for the White House in 2016. Asked by ABC News last year if she would consider running for president, Warren said, "No, no, no, no, no.

National union leaders are also fans of Warren. Lee Saunders, president of the powerful American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), sent around Warren's Labor Day message to local AFSCME officials across the country.

"Elizabeth Warren has made it clear that she understands the role the labor movement plays in bringing dignity and respect to all workers, not only those who belong to unions," Saunders said in a statement to The Hill.

Dorian Warren, a Columbia University professor who specializes in labor politics, said it was a "super-smart" move by the senator to come to the convention for the nation's largest labor federation.

"It is a thank you to the labor movement, who stood by her not only during her election race but also during her time at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau," said Warren, who's not related to the Massachusetts Democrat.

Further, he said, it's not a bad idea for the senator to garner labor's support, which traditionally helps turn out the vote for Democratic candidates across the country.

"If she has an eye on 2016 or 2020, to be with labor early on and earn labor support, and if she decides to jump into the primary in 2016, having that labor support could really help her," Warren said. 

The left is casting about for a Dennis Kucinich far left loon to carry the banner in 2016. But, the only chance that Warren would have is if Hillary Clinton decided against running. There are several scenarios where that might happen, mostly having to do with the state of her health or the health of former president Clinton.

At this point, it wouldn't hurt from ambitious pols to put themsevlves into a favorable position just in case Hillary nixes a run.



I wish I could comfort you and tell you that ultra-liberal Elizabeth Warren couldn't be president in a million years and that you're just having a bad dream if you are imagining it.

Unfortunately, you could have said the same thing about Barack Obama in 2005 and look what happened there.

Warren is set to open the AFL-CIO confab in Los Angles where there appears to be at least some speculatoon that Big Labor's favorite lap dog might be just what the Democratic party needs in 2016.

The Hill:

"The bottom line is, I think the world of her and I think the whole labor movement does. She is a woman of her word and she knows you never lose when you stand up for what's right," said Massachusetts AFL-CIO President Steve Tolman.

Union officials buzz when asked about Warren's 2016 prospects.

"I am not thinking about the presidency right now, but I do know we have the greatest U.S. senator representing us. I want her in the Senate doing the great work that she's doing," Tolman said. "Give me a couple more years and let me find out she's interested, and I will drive the train."

Warren is seemingly not interested in running for the White House in 2016. Asked by ABC News last year if she would consider running for president, Warren said, "No, no, no, no, no.

National union leaders are also fans of Warren. Lee Saunders, president of the powerful American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), sent around Warren's Labor Day message to local AFSCME officials across the country.

"Elizabeth Warren has made it clear that she understands the role the labor movement plays in bringing dignity and respect to all workers, not only those who belong to unions," Saunders said in a statement to The Hill.

Dorian Warren, a Columbia University professor who specializes in labor politics, said it was a "super-smart" move by the senator to come to the convention for the nation's largest labor federation.

"It is a thank you to the labor movement, who stood by her not only during her election race but also during her time at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau," said Warren, who's not related to the Massachusetts Democrat.

Further, he said, it's not a bad idea for the senator to garner labor's support, which traditionally helps turn out the vote for Democratic candidates across the country.

"If she has an eye on 2016 or 2020, to be with labor early on and earn labor support, and if she decides to jump into the primary in 2016, having that labor support could really help her," Warren said. 

The left is casting about for a Dennis Kucinich far left loon to carry the banner in 2016. But, the only chance that Warren would have is if Hillary Clinton decided against running. There are several scenarios where that might happen, mostly having to do with the state of her health or the health of former president Clinton.

At this point, it wouldn't hurt from ambitious pols to put themsevlves into a favorable position just in case Hillary nixes a run.